Good source for list of component parts of a gas-powered lawn mower and their costs

Hey, as part of an environmental design project I need to get data on the component parts that an average gas-powered lawn mower contains, and their associated costs. Ideally, this data would be representative of the industry averages, but any specific model or design that's reasonably standard (in terms of size, power, material and energy inputs and outputs, etc.) would be good. Does anyone know any good sources for this data? Thanks.
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Ben wrote:

Any manufacturer's parts list will list the pieces-parts.
Retail prices on individual parts basis will be nonsensical for any purpose other than repair costs to an individual. Where one would get actual manufacturers' costs to them I've no idea--I'm sure they all consider that proprietary information.
One could, I suppose, do something creative w/ comparing repair parts prices in ratio to each other and then in comparison to the cost of the new engine (accounting for assumed margin as well, of course). Extremely crude, no doubt and likely too high yet.
As for the other generalities, again they're so general and there's such a wide range (from little 3.5 hp pushers to the 27+hp ZTRs as just the one example of hp) that unless you have a specific target it would end up like most environmental studies I've seen; meaningless.
--


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I agree with all of the above. I doubt there is much correlation between the repair parts prices and the manufacturer's costs on parts for most anything. If the part happens to be unique and their is no second source, then it can sell for $30 even though the cost to the manufacturer is $3. A common spark plug might cost the manufacturer . 75, while it sells retail for $3. Those two ratios are vastly different, so how can you compare them? And to find out the true cost of any of those parts from a practical standpoint is impossible.
First thing I would try is googling to try to find any environmental cost/benefit type studies that might already be available online for low emmission small engines. If that doesn't work, to complete the project, you can find repair parts list and breakdowns online at "small engine repair" websites. Or go down to Sears, pick out a mower, get the model number and go to Searsparts.com. But as DPB said, the results will be meaningless. Which only makes one wonder about the competency of a professor that would give out such an assinine assignment.
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