Good Choice of Table Saw for very casual home use ??

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Ulysses wrote:

At least a tin cup.
In my shop I wear an apron. It's lead-lined and came from an x-ray lab. I think it's bulletproof.
Just to be on the safer side, I'm going to line it with home-made ballistic armor, that is, scraps of engineered laminate flooring.
Still, I see people on TV get ready to use a power tool, something like a battery-operated screw-driver or an electric spoon, and they suit themselves up like they were off to train attack dogs.
What's the worst that could happen?
As Dilios said: "Hardly, my lord, it's just an eye. The gods saw fit to grace me with a spare."
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On Mon, 9 Feb 2009 14:26:20 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

Aprons are a shop no-no, per machining 101.
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Michael Dobony wrote:

Tell that to my 7th grade shop teacher- he made us all run out and buy one the first week. Same store that sold the phys ed uniforms. I think they got a kickback or something. And yes, everyone wrapped the strings around and tied them in front.
-- aem sends...
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First, depending on where you are..see if there is a WWW.CRAIGSLIST.ORG website nearby and get the saw through "TOOLS" on the site for perhaps HALF of what you'll pay for a new one at Sears or HD. Go look at several tablesaws and see what the market has out there before you buy. Have the seller crosscut and rip a piece of 2 X 4 or 2 X 6 for you and see how they do.
Isn't there anyone knowledgeable and handy THERE that you can ask to go along with you when you go saw shopping ? If not, I've had good service from DELTA table saws starting from an old Rockwell Beaver 9" with a 1/2 hp motor (worked fine crosscutting) could barely rip (lengthwise) a "2 by" piece of lumber. I ve upgraded to one of the best saws on the market now, a 10" 3(real) HP Delta UNISAW with a Biesemeyer fence. The fence alone is worth $ 300-400 ..its a beauty but you don't need something like that. .
Second, BEWARE when comparing various saws motor HP that Sears commonly uses 'max" HP "DEVELOPED" which is the power draw/created JUST BEFORE the motor is driven to fail...Divide the HP number they use in half to get a realistic number. Ie. their "develops 1HP" motor is really a 1/2 hp motor.
Finally, a lot depends on the quality of the blade. Get a good name brand (not Harbor Freight Tools etc) carbide tip blade, up to 40 tooth for 'general' work and make sure you don't cut any staples, screws or nails in the lumber.
Good luck R
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wrote:

Do be careful not to buy something that has been abused to the point it is ready to fail. Specifically smell around the motor for burned smells (showing it had a major overload long enough to overheat the motor) and for other wear.

Easiest is the specification plate that *should* be found on each unit. Figure *roughly* that 10 amps is about 1 HP for an electric motor. (the number is less, but inefficiency in the motor and system drive it higher). So ignore a '2.3 HP rated' sticker, and look at the power drawn on the nameplate for a good indication of how powerful it is.
That said, power is not critical unless you need speed. You can cut a lot of wood with a less powerful saw, it just takes (much) longer!

Absolutely! A good high quality blade is really important. I've used saws with bad blades (and bought at least one for virtually nothing because the blade so was dull that it would not cut, and the seller didn't realize it was just a bad blade, and not the saw).

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"SKIL" with one "L" is a brand name. Commonly seen at construction sites with other brands as well like Porter-Cable. Hand-held electric circular saw is probably what you mean, and, may even be made by SKIL. Unless you're doing something that requires good fit and appearance of cuts, such a saw is just fine. It all boils down to good measurements, following the measured lines made without cutting that line. Not forcing the cut too quickly. A very lightweight saw may try to move left and right indiscriminantly. A dull blade takes longer and may scorch the wood. Using the right blade also helps such as when to use a cross-cut blade, a combination blade, and a ripping blade.
As another poster stated, the most important part of a table saw is the table. Actually, I'm speaking of a compound miter saw. A table saw is very limited in lengthy cross-cuts, excellent for plywood and rips. It must accomodate size of lumber, and must be rock solid when using the saw. There are some reversals needed in some cuts, like a hip rafter, that some compound miter saws can't accomodate on both sides of the cut. The bevel only swings one way. Can be done, but not very intuitive. A 10" compound miter saw with laser sounds adequate for most of what you're speaking of. Get one with the laser that runs off the AC, not replaceable batteries. A genuine table saw is best for ripping plywood and other lumber.
--
Dave



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