Good battery backup sump pump

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They can suck plenty.

_Only_ if you're on municipal water that will continue through the emergencies you need the backup for.
If there's no water, you're screwed.
Emergency backup systems should rely on as little possible outside of your control.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Most bilge pumps don't have a large lift rating. They just need to able to pump over the side of a boat.
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Many of the ones I've seen charts for have listings at 3' and/or 5'. Most people would probably find their sump reqt's in the 3-6' head range.
The convention for some is that they're named after their 5' GPH rating, others are named for their "open flow" (0' head) rate.
Especially if you see one rated at both 3' and 5', you can extrapolate a reasonably accurate value at 10'. Extrapolation much beyond double their rating (ie 10' for a pump showing 5' rating) is likely to be wildly inaccurate (on the overly optimistic side).
Here's a sample of listings: http://ca.binnacle.com/online/dept.asp?dept%5Fid 30
The first one (only $19.95CDN) is 720/630/500 GPH at 0/3'/5' head, 1.4A. That will run a long time on a car battery. Probably 350-400GPH at 10'
At $50CDN, this one http://ca.binnacle.com/online/product.asp?dept%5Fid 30&pf%5Fid$138 will probably drive in excess of 700GPH at 10', 2.6A.
[Neither of the above have float switches BTW.]
I'm probably going to buy the latter one, and use a magnetic float switch scavenged from a deceased AC submersible pump.
As Gary previously mentioned, calculating long term draw down on a car battery isn't a simple matter of dividing the amp-hours by the current draw. A 2.6A pump won't run almost 40 hours continuous on a 100AH car battery, but it should for a lot longer than 10 hours.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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So get one for a yacht.
Gary
--
Gary Heston snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net

Contrary to popular opinion, _not_ everyone loves Raymond.
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snipped-for-privacy@groupinfo.com (Chris Szilagyi) wrote in message

If I really want to go the distance, I'd get a second pump with a gas generator. But right now I just have a back up sump pump. I am willing to accept the risk of a power failure and heavy spring rain happening at the same time. If they do, So be it.
But I'd make sure there is proper drainage away from the house.
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Power failures and heavy rains tend to happen together, unfortunately.
I have a generator for this (well water, not city).
Banty
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In my area (central NJ), there have been far many times power failure coincident with big snow storm then heavy rain. But there has never been once power failure happens after a persistent spring rain which last a few days. Either that or drainage around the house is pretty good. But no, I do hear the sump pump working occasionally, mostly in spring. I should know. I would have gone out and get myself a generator if my plan failed.
My guess is you use your generator for the well much more frequently than the sump pump.
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In 1991 we had an ice storm that cut off power to the region for up to 2 weeks, followed by several days of heavy rain. I had 5 feet of water in my basement. It happens. Since hurricanes and tornados are associated with heavy rain, I would think it happens commonly.
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Two weeks w/o power in America? Un-believable.
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I believe it was longer than that in some parts of upstate NY after the great ice storm.
Just across the border, there were places near Montreal where it was 6 weeks. A few places near here (Ottawa) on the order of 4 weeks.
Ice storms can be pretty drastic. Our backyard sounded like a war zone, complete with heavy artillery (breaking trees) and shell flashes (big blue flashes on the horizon as yet another line went down).
Montreal's power ring is fed by 7 HV lines. 6 of the 7 went down.
I believe Quebec Hydro's bill for line repair was on the order of 1-2 _billion_.
We were fortunate, without power for only 36 hours.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Heck, yes. My parents, just outside of Rochester, were without power for over 3 weeks. Good thing they had a wood stove for backup heat.

Personally, I enjoyed the exploding transformers. Nothing like being woken up from a sound sleep by a pole transformer blowing up a few feet from your door. Not to mention watching 4 of your housemates cars being completely crushed by falling trees.
Needless to say, we spent the rest of the evening sleeping in the basement.
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On Tue, 03 Aug 2004 14:43:01 GMT, someone wrote:

I remember that one, I lived in that area at the time. My power was back on in a few days, but I lived right "in town". Repairs that can restore larger numbers of people are done first. More outlying sparesely poulated areas were sometimes not reached for a week or two, and then if you had an *individual* problem with the feed to your one house being torn down, that got exaimed even later.
I heard (hearsay) that some people waited for their street lines to be energized only to find that the power company had disconnected their individual feeds because the lines were torn down from their house itself, and that was the responsibility of the homeowner to get an electrician to fix so that it would be safe to reconnect to the grid.
-v.
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Ontario Hydro and its various regionals triaged stuff, prioritizing fixes in terms of numbers of people and how much repair work was required.
When we lost power, we realized that a few of our neighbors were still up, but huge sections nearby weren't.
After about 24 hours of this, I drove out to examine the power lines. The feed down our street had four conductors - three phase plus a neutral I think. As it turned out, anybody whose pole pig was attached to _one_ of the power conductors and the apparent neutral was up, anybody connected to the other two were down.
Which meant that the outage _had_ to be between us and the nearest substation or in the substation itself. Which was only a 1/4 mile away.
Called Hydro and told them that info, and that if they fixed it, they'd bring up at least two subdivisions - a high return on limited resources. We had power back in an hour.
We were lucky. Metcalfe township, about 15 miles south of us had several _miles_ of primary line down. Several days later a friend of mine and I went down to help out the emergency crews by safety inspecting (at homeowner request) homeowner generator installations.
All told, most of Metcalfe was down for a month.
And... hooking up a 200Kw generator to an emergency supply/road crew depot... [To give you an idea of how chaotic things were, this generator was on a topsoil screening rig (full size tractor-trailer unit) that used electric motors for conveyor belts and screening unit. Big Cummins diesel motor driving a 600V three phase generator...]

Hydro was a bit more generous than this. They warned over the radio that anybody who had a physically damaged feed should see if they could get it fixed _ahead_ of time.
They'd pull an individual feed if it was hazardous.
They'd reconnect it if it was their equipment (everything up to but not including the masthead) that was damaged, but there might be a delay. If _your_ equipment was damaged, they'd make you get it fixed.
The worst situation I know of is someone nearby us who was on a 1.5Km Hydro-owned but single residence branch. With the 1.5Km going thru dense bush - not to mention ice storm damage strewn. I wouldn't have dreamt of going anywhere _near_ that line under those conditions. Some places were like trying to wade thru a "pickup sticks" game, only giant size. With loose trees about to fall on you. Yum.
They were down several weeks longer than the 36 hours in total we were out.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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I'd be more inclined to put solar cells on my roof and power the pump off of that in case of power outage instead of battery packs. And if you get a new sump pump, look for one with stainless steel parts.
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says...

Gee - in my area having clouds cover the sun seems to cooincide with the sump pum having more to to pump...
Banty
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On 29 Jul 2004 12:35:37 -0700, someone wrote:

Good luck.
35 years ago, we had one with a brass impeller (and it was even older than that since it was already in the house when we got it). I am familiar with the impeller because something got sucked into the pump and jammed it.
Lack of plastic parts is still no guarantee that the pump will "always" work. Better put a water level alarm in the pit if you can't be bothered to go check it from time to time. Of course if your house is unatended anyways....
-v.
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I use a submersible 1/6 hp Flotek pump..... it is inside my home, rain water supply tank, and I use this pump to give my home an 'On Demand' water source.... it has been used since 2000.... it works good... I bought it from the Home Depot for about $70....
Gig
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Has anybody tried one of the Wayne 24v primary/backup pump system? It has a brushless 24vdc pump. a.. Pumps up to 3500 GPH on either 120VAC or batteries a.. Easy to install a.. Battery charger/power supply manages the system's power by switching to battery power when household electricity is not available a.. Reliable pump with cast iron and stainless steel components a.. Two battery system pumps up to 20,000 gallons when fully charged a.. UL recognized component battery charger/power supply http://www.waynepumps.com/products/product.php?ISP40
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