Good all-weather water-proof outdoor paint/sealer?

Hi,
I'm having to replace the outside mouldings (and possibly frame) of a doorway on my garage. This doorway is on a side that is very often exposed to "horizontal rain" due to local blustery winds during rainy (Vancouver) weather, and as a result the mouldings (and possibly door frame) have become water logged and are rotting. Therefore, after to do the repairs, I want to be sure the problem doesn't recur by using a paint and/or sealer that will keep the wind driven rain from breaking through and causing damage to the wood for some time to come. Therefore... any recommendations anybody?
TIA, Ken
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Aside from priming and painting the standard stuff, couple of things I can think of "to be sure the problem doesn't recur":
Is there any of the "composite" molding available where you are. Never rots. Doesn't split when nailed or screwed. Paintable. Here for instance, brick molding comes in primed pine and the composite stuff. Price for either is comparable.
Not sure if you have a table and chop saw or your abilities. Make some out of PT. Make sure you let it dry (few weeks maybe). Then prime and paint.
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wrote:

I disagree wth this advice. Using a composit material in this situation is likely to leave you with rotting wood behind the moulding (in the frame), which is more difficult to deal with than rotting molding.

Disagree wth this, too. First, because you'll be making lots of cuts, you'll be exposing the interior of the wood, where the PT checmicals haven't reached. To maintain the PT, you should dip the cut ends. But if you do that, paint won't hold to the wood. Paint doesn't bind very well to PT wood anyway, leading to water getting behind the PT wood and into the frame.
Second, pressure treated wood won't rot (right away), but it will crack and split due to exposure (or just over time, because PT is rarely well dried). Because PT wood tends to be low quailty wood to begin with, it tends to split pretty easily. And then you'll again be dealing with water problems in the frame.
I would recommend just doing a good job with traditional materials.
1. Backprime every piece of wood you use. In your situation, I would prime the non-exposed frame pieces, as well. Prime all the cut end-grains. Use a good quality oil-based primer.
2. Use a high quality oil-based paint.
3. While you're doing the repairs, consider how water can escape from behind the moulding if it gets there. Allow for "drainage".
4. Check it a few times a year and repair any breaks in the paint film or other problem you see.
Anther thought would be to consider using cedar. I don't have any real experience with it -- I live in the US North East, and the only cedar we see is in siding. But in Vancover you might be able to get other sizes in cedar. But check with others here or at your local stores, as I don't know enough about cedar to recommend it - just something to look into.
Terry
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wrote

You make some good points & possibilities Terry. Could contest some a little but that's not getting anyone anywhere.
If done via painting, endpriming and back priming are a must like you said. Painting with oil based is another. In cases where the endcuts are very likely to get repeated water exposure, I've even coated the ends with silicone. Not sure how effective it was but I don't think it hurt.
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wrote:

Good idea, and reminds me that I forgot to mention caulk. With "horizontal rain", as the OP talked about, I would be carefull to caulk all the joints. Leave the bottom open, so water has an exit.
T.
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Water doesn't exit vertically with horizontal wind.
--
Jonny
"Terry" < snipped-for-privacy@none.invalid> wrote in message
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Of course it does. The wind drives the water into a joint, but once into the joint there's no wind to speak of, and the water will move down.
Even if it didn't, you would want to leave an exit path so the wood will dry out after the rain and wind stops.
Terry
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If its water logged now water is getting behind it, I dont see it a paint issue but a caulking issue.
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Bear in mind the horizontal continuous wind causes simlar affects that a topmost horizontal surface may have due to moisture disturbance of the surface.
Caulk the heck out of every joint, crevice, or whatever. Use caulking that is flexible with the weather and takes paint and primer well. If you do well here, most any famous brand paint or primer will work designed for outdoor use. I use Sherwin Williams paint/primer myself.
--
Jonny
"Ken Moiarty" < snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca> wrote in message
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Thanks to all of you guys for the helpful responses. I'm going to go with the oil based paint and proper caulking route. Using cedar is not a bad idea, except that the cedar sold today may or may not be the heart- wood you could be sure of buying 30 years ago. Due to reduced old growth logging in lieu of pressure from environmentalist groups, a lot of the cedar today is from young trees and therefore basically just sapwood, which doesn't last like the, previously common, old cedar heartwood lumber. And due to PR concerns in this day of 'environmentalistic sentimentalism', lumber vendors won't tell you if they are selling cedar heartwood, as that would invite negative publicity from aggresssive environmental-activist groups who are opposed to all old growth logging. (I learned all this when I was researching cedar as an option for my backyard deck.)
Ken
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That's what I have always thought... the newly planted little trees in the replanted commercial forests just don't have the quality of the old growth forests. Not even close.
Max
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Paintable silicone or polyurethane would be my first thought. Yea maybe 5 bucks a tube but probably only need one or two.
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What's wrong with cellular plastic trim moulding? No rot, ever.

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On Tue, 18 Apr 2006 01:05:42 -0400, "Jim Hunter"

You've still got to caulk or somehow seal around it, to protect the wood behind it.
T.
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is that the composite doesn't rot regardless if caulking has dried out. Then all appears primo on the surface while studs behind turns to mush. Invite for ants/termites as well.
But that's why I mentioned the silicone or polyurethane caulk.
All a matter of owner awareness/attentiveness. I worry if nothing is wrong that I must have missed something. I've seen people ignore plumbing leaks/missing tub caulk until a 2nd floor toilet or shower can be seen from downstairs...sometimes protruding through.
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Yep the plastic stuff "Azek" is the way to go, I use it here on Cape Cod, especially near the ocean, they have a special two part "calk" that actually bonds to material (like airplane glue on plastic), behind the trim use vicor, make a proper sill pan on your doors and windows out of copper or lead (again vicor the opening first) and you're all set.
http://www.bostoncedar.com/azek.html
ED

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