god-dang latex paint

I replaced most of the walls and surfaces in my bathroom, except for the ceiling and one or two other small places.
Along with the new drywall I installed, I primed the ceiling etc. with latex primer. Unfortunately, those places had oil-based paint underneath it.
I know now that I should have roughed up the surface of the oil-based paint before I put the primer down. Long story short, when I applied the final coat of latex paint over the primer, the primer softened and the whole shebang started peeling away, leaving me with my original pink, shiny, oil-based paint surface.
So, it looks like I have to take what's left of the latex primer down and start again on those areas. I want to make sure to do it right this time.
My question is: what is right? Will simply sanding the surface of the oil-based paint be sufficient to get the latex primer to cling to it? Anything else I can do to help guarantee success?
Thanks
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Should NEVER paint any kind of paint over a shiny surface, it is only asking for trouble. If you sand the shine off the oil base paint, not just adding a few scratches but actually sand it till it is dull, you should have no problems with latex paint over it if the old oil paint is actually old. If it is only a few months old, it will still retain some oil compounds and the water based latex paint won't stick.

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The first step is to make sure that the existing oil coat is not cracked or peeling. Assuming that it is not, you should definitely sand it to provide a "tooth" for the latex. Many people then go over it again with something like Liquid Sandpaper to both degloss and soften the oil paint. Most importantly, to me anyway, is to then prime it. The traditional primer is oil based but there are supposed to be some water based primers that are made for this purpose. Check out the directions on the can of latex or ask someone at a paint store. You may not get good information at a big box store.
Good Luck!
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wrote:

Go over it with KILZ. Their alcohol based material, NOT their water based stuff. That's one of the things Kilz is made for. Beware, that stuff must be well ventilated. The smell is strong and in a small room you will soon be drunk !!!! Turn off all pilot lights too. Read the can....
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On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 19:45:57 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.com wrote:
<snip>

This guy needs grip, & the advice from most of the posts I can see is sound. I'd take issue with the lead scare though.
The Kilz I believe you refer to is better for stain blocking than for grip. Yea nasty stuff.
But kilz is for pussys,- If you want a primer that will stick to just about antthing _and_ knock you out _ at the same time     XIM! wullstick to justaboutantyynegl & Ipromice yew itwunt Teh XIM manWhhhoeeeman i tellyou!!!thatximis coolshtlnockyoudkiydikinthdrt. Icountbelveathshithappmanitelya
Ahem, Never mind.
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wrote:

I have used KILZ for this application and it works great. The possible lead is one reason to avoid sanding it.
Personally if it was my ceiling, I'd just put ceiling tile or something over it. All that screwing around sounds like too much work to me, Of course I hate painting....
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clipped

Kilz won't stick any better than the paint if it isn't prepped right. It's a stain-blocking primer, not glue.
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the stain blocking kilz is a tinted shellac, which should stick to most anything.
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Charles Spitzer wrote:

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peter p. wrote:

be dog-gone careful in case it's lead based
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CJT wrote:

paper, which is the best way to do it and not have the paper clog.
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On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 13:25:38 -0500, "peter p."

pigmented shellac primer like BIN. Top coat with your choice of finishes.
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Good chance that the oil-based paint contains lead; IOW, sanding it isn't a good idea.
Since it's in a bathroom, you're better off with an oil-based topcoat anyway. Your best bet IMO is to clean it thoroughly with TSP and apply an oil-based finish. If you're still set on using latex, clean with TSP anyway, and apply an oil-based primer. That will stick to the existing paint, and you can paint over it with latex.
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clipped

The surface has to be clean, as well. Wash, rinse, dry. Use a little bleach if there is any mildew. Sand and then remove dust. I got goofy behavior when I began painting a bathroom ceiling, although I had done very careful prep. I think the ceiling was moist from the morning shower. Let it dry and the rest of the job went fine.
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you should get an oil primer this way u will be able to apply a latex paint and this will also act as a good barrier for mildew since it is in the bathroom and moisture is an issue
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