Gluing rubber to pewter

I have a couple of old laptop stands that I just love. They are perfect for my needs. I've had them for at least 15 years.
The past year or so, the little rubber pads on the surface of the stand have gotten a little loose and some of them fall out from time to time. I would like to glue them back in place, but I am not sure which glue to use.
The stands were made by Allsop. They don't make this particular stand any more. Here's the closest stand that they still do make, but it doesn't have the rubber pads.
http://www.allsop.com/laptop-stands/metal-art-jr-pewter/
Here's one on eBay that looks to be exactly like mine:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Allsop-Metal-Art-Notebook-Laptop-Stand-G1Z-/140921982468?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item20cf9ace04
I took a few photos of my stand showing how the pads "snap" into place, if rubber can actually snap. Here's the Dropbox link:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/a5x5rs5bwmlk5aw/AADbgJ0QOWS1jwLsCb1jxP6ca?dl=0
I'm pretty sure that the pads are rubber and the stand itself is pewter. What will glue rubber to pewter?
My first choice was T-88 from System Three. I've used it for years for a variety of projects and it has worked well, but it doesn't mention rubber.
My next choice was Gorilla Glue. It also doesn't mention rubber and the "find the right glue" quiz on their website returned no hits for "rubber on metal".
My last choice was Loctite Super Glue. I have not had good luck with any super glue.
What do you all recommend?
Question #2: Should I glue a gasket on the back of the same sized as the pad? I think part of the problem with the pad falling out is the little tab, which is exposed, gets hit. If I surrounded it with a gasket, that might not happen as much.
Any other suggestions?
Thanks.
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On 5/1/2015 4:41 PM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

I'd use the Gorilla glue. It is somewhat elastomeric like rubber. I've used it to stick rubberized carpet pieces to chair legs as guides.
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...snip...

Do you mean gluing pieces of carpet to the bottom of the chair legs to protect the floor? That would put a lot more stress on the glue bond than anything my laptop stand would experience. My only concern is that my second surface is metal, not wood. I've used Gorilla glue in the past on wood with good results.
Would you put a rubber washer/gasket on the other side? It would provide a little protection for the rubber tab as well as a place for the glue to go through the holes in the base.
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I'd use contact cement for any situation like that where 2 dissimilar materials need to be glued together.
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wrote:

Any particular brand that works with these two surfaces (metal and rubber)?
Bennett suggested the thistothat site (http://www.thistothat.com /). It recommends Household Goop, which says it is a contact adhesive.
Would you put a rubber washer/gasket on the other side? It would provide a little protection for the rubber tab as well as a place for the glue to go through the holes in the base.
I wonder why no one has produced a family of contact cements each of which bonds to one or more specific surfaces and to any of the other contact cements. If I want to bond A to B, I get the A cement and the B cement, apply each to the respective surfaces, then press them together.
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| Any particular brand that works with these two surfaces (metal and | rubber)? |
There are two basic types -- the fumey kind and the water-base kind. The former is generally better, though I use the latter for laminate countertops and I've had good luck. I also use it to stick vinyl runner mat to plywood and to stick sheet metal to plywood.
| Bennett suggested the thistothat site (http://www.thistothat.com /). It | recommends Household Goop, which says it is a contact adhesive. | Their site says it's silicone based. If it's what I'm thinking of it's a gooey, clear product that's more of a filler than a glue, but I'm not sure.
| Would you put a rubber washer/gasket on the other side? It would provide | a little protection for the rubber tab as well as a place for the glue | to go through the holes in the base.
No. I'd just glue it.
The metal may be called "pewter" but it's probably steel with some kind of coating on it. The only problem I could foresee would be if the finish is just paint and dissolves in glue solvent.
| | I wonder why no one has produced a family of contact cements each of | which bonds to one or more specific surfaces and to any of the other | contact cements. If I want to bond A to B, I get the A cement and the B | cement, apply each to the respective surfaces, then press them together. |
The function of contact cement is to bond dissimilar materials. It's designed to stick to surfaces and then sticks very well to itself. You paint a little on each surface, let it dry to the touch, then put the two together. There is one limitation: You only get one chance. Once the two sides touch they're stuck. You can't reposition them.
It's not like an epoxy, with an a and b part. It's more like an adhesive, liquid rubber. The flexibility is what makes it work so well. You can have different materials with very different expansion rates and the glue stretches a bit to accomodate that: Wood and plastic. Wood and sheet metal. Plastic laminate to particle board or MDF. Rubber to wood or metal... Rubber roofing cement is similar.
So there's no need for a family of contact cements. It's a type of glue that sticks to itself and works the same way no matter what the two surfaces are. It's an adaptable product. You use one coat on non-porous surfaces; two coats on porous surfaces. You can get the non-water base in small bottles or in quarts/gallons. It will say highly flammable. I think the water-base only comes in gallons and probably isn't as good for what you want to do.
I'd just brush some on to both surfaces, let it dry, then carefully position the tab in the hole and push them together. It should work fine.
I usually use superglue for metal-to-metal where the bond has no gaps. It's great for that but it's not good for much else. For porous bonds, especially where there might be a gap, I use epoxy. For wood I use regular wood glue. For anything like rubber or sheet metal or laminate being glues to anything else I use contact cement. (It's also the best thing for resoling sandals and shoes.)
Silicone adhesive is OK for low-demand things like sticking plastic to plastic where it won't get any stress, but it's not really very strong.
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wrote:

It is clear and gooey. It looks a lot like the clear component in epoxy. (The resin?) It claims to be a "contact adhesive and sealant" and it gets good reviews on Amazon.

I think you're right. They say it has an enamel finish, so it's probably not real pewter, but steel with an enamel coating. I'll at least scuff it up with my Dremel.

Very informative, thanks.
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Take a look at this very helpful web site: http://www.thistothat.com/
On 5/1/2015 1:41 PM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

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wrote:

Thanks, that is a very handy resource.
I put in rubber and metal and it came back with Household Goop, whoich I also happen to have a tube of. It says it's a "contact adhesive".
Would you put a rubber washer/gasket on the other side? It would provide a little protection for the rubber tab as well as a place for the glue to go through the holes in the base.
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