Gluing Plastic Storage Containers

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I'm working on a project, using "something" plastic for a float on salt water. Am contemplating using one of the low, rectangular plastic storage containers if I can cement it closed to make it water-tight. Don't know what kind of plastic they are typically made of - polystyrene, polypropylene? Hubby and I like to engineer small, inconsequential projects :o) Trying to rig a small, floating platform to store kayak out of the water. Any helpful suggestions appreciated. Since it's almost Christmas, you're welcome to make fun, as well :o)
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I'd head to a place like Home Depot and choose some type of silicone sealer that's designed for clinging to smooth surfaces like tile, tubs or glass. Since you'll need a lot, focus on the tubes that fit into a caulking gun. I'd use sandpaper to rough up all the plastic surfaces, and then wipe them clean with rubbing alcohol. First, apply the sealer to the top edge of the box where it touches the lid. Give it a day to dry (no matter WHAT the instructions say about how it cures in 4 hours). Then, flip the box upside down and load the sealer heavily into the seam under the lip of the lid.
Make sure that kayak's tied to something on land, just in case...... :-)

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Doug Kanter wrote:

Yer talkin' to someone in the "Land of Four Hurricanes". Heck, yes, we tie things down :o) All except for the 15'x5' skylight that few over onto the top of a palm tree :o)
Plan on keeping it at front end of boat slip, tied to dock and seawall.Does your advice to use silicone sealer come with a guarantee? Does anyone know how to compute how many 12x24" (bottom dimensions) I will need to float a 50# kayak and a couple of 1x6 pressure treated boards? Plan to build very simple framework that will just lay onto the plastic containers, with longitudinal boards protruding above the lateral members so's the kayak will slide up onto it; probably bevel long. members on one end to help it along.
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sealer
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tie
No guarantees whatsoever! Having followed the thread, some of the other suggestions sound better than mine, particularly those which involve blocks of styrofoam, and construction adhesive.
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HDPE and PP are the common plastics used for storage containers. These materials are not easily or reliably glued. Most reliable joining is by plastic hot air welding or similar techniques. One old idea is filling up the space with ping pong balls or old tennis balls for flotation. You might also find a source of industrial waste and look for the blue plastic barrels that liquid materials are shipped in. These would not need modification to float. Another way that works is to prepare a polystyrene foam block of the shape you want and fiberglass it with an epoxy resin. Polyester resins will dissolve the foam but epoxies don't. These materials are usually found in boat shops. Another cheap source of containers might be plastic gas tanks from a auto salvage yard. Sealing them up could be possible using a heat source like a soldering iron. Hope this helps...
Joe
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I was just helping a friend install a printer that was a replacement unit. The packing technique might work for you.
Instead of foam inserts, the packing material was simply good size plastic bags full of those foamed peanuts. The bags were packed just loosely enough to allow them to be fitted to the printer and having the peanuts bagged kept them from the usual mess.
See what kind of very strong bags you can find. As they say "whatever floats your boat".
Charlie
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"Charlie Bress" <Here-I-am-at-the-last-moment.com> wrote in

Most importantly,this also keeps the protected item from sinking to the bottom of the container and not having any protection,while the loose peanuts float on top.I've seen many expensive electronic units damaged by improper packing using loose styro peanuts.
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Jim Yanik
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Go get some 30 gallon plastic drums and be done with it.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote in m18.aol.com:

I was just commenting on how people will take an expensive item to be shipped,and toss it into a box and fill the box with loose styro peanuts and consider it good enough for shipping.Then they are amazed to hear that it had been damaged beyond repair because it was packed poorly.
This time of year when people are shipping Xmas presents,the "pillow-of- peanuts" technique of packing items is good to know.
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Jim Yanik
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Up here in Canada Futureshop is now using little bags (like sandwich bags) filled with air instead of peanuts. My telescope came packed in a solid block of brown expanded foam. We have a local high end chromer who uses a white expanded foam to ship his stuff. They do a lot of custom motorcycle chrome work.
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m18.aol.com:

Those bags could be punctured and deflate.Or have a slow leak and deflate.That means no protection.Even bubble wrap has MANY cells,so loss of a few does not matter.
Puncture all the peanut-pillows and it doesn't matter;No effect.

We had custom expanding foam packing(InstaPak) at my TEK field offices,and there always was the possibility of foam sticking to the item,permanently ruining it,or too much foam crushing the item upon expansion,or it squirting out any opening in the box,or splitting the box.It's messy stuff to work with. We received lots of packages with loose peanuts,so making peanut-pillows was a great way of recycling them,and cheaper than using the expanding foam,or cutting pieces of regular foam to fit.
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Jim Yanik
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Yep, the case on my last 100 stack of blank DVDs was cracked so bad I thought some of the DVDs might be damaged but so far no coasters.

My 10" Dob telescope (pretty big) was wrapped in plastic with the foam on the outside. The scope tube would be easy to crush if too much foam was used.

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wrote:

Soemtimes the foam found it's way through a tear or missed opening in the plastic and it sticks REALLY good to things,nearly impossible to remove without damage to the item.

We occasionally received bad batches of foam components(2-part foam),and the foam would not expand immediately as it should,and we had a hard time with it,putting too much foam into the boxes and then it would begin expanding uncontrollably.It made terrible messes.
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Jim Yanik
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I would try construction adhesive. Sticks to almost everything. Comes in small and large tubes. W W
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wrote:

How about PVC? You can use plastic ends. The parts are readily available, inexpensive, and cut easily.
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Phisherman wrote:

We originally intended to use fat PVC, but it's pretty heavy and I don't know how to figure out how much flotation is needed to hold up the wood frame and the kayak.
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If you have a recycle bin close by you can get plastic 1 gallon milk jugs free. Bleach bottles or any gallon jug will work but I understand that the plastic in milk jugs will last for decades. Or check your local auto repair shop and pickup jugs from oil and antifreeze. These can pollute so milk jugs are better. 2 jugs filled with foam support almost 100 pounds. build a frame under your deck to hold the bottles fill the frame and then cover with galvanized fencing. This will hold the bottles in place. Once the dock is in the water the bottles tight against the bottom.
This will be cheap as hell and last for years.
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I should add my buddy filled his jugs cheap at a re-chroming shop. They shipped their finished product in boxes filled with expanded white foam. It is really cheap in bulk. Enclosed in the milk jugs it will last forever.
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1 US gallon milk jugs weight 50lb each from the store?
Mike
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Perhaps you should lay of the Christmas nog before posting.:)
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