Gluing aluminum to glass

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The lining was a fairly recent addition. I remember the marketing hype about how it'd improve the taste of various beverages.
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mike wrote:

Actually they were lining them all along. I worked in a business that manufactured precision measurement systems used in can plants among others. The marketing folks decided it was time to make that a "new and improved" pitch.
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As to not hijack this thread, if the OP was concerned about acidic caulking effects on aluminum, he could pour vinegar in some aluminum foil set in a bowl for a few hours or even overnight to see what happens.
Aluminum foil has always held up to such treatment for me without damage.
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 08:23:49 -0700 (PDT), mike

The OP may want the job to last longer than that.
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On Jul 22, 12:13 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Ive seen the acidic type eat through #18 copper wire. Mind you that it took 3 or 4 years.
Jimmie
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On Jul 22, 9:13 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

How long do you think the curing by-products hang around? Futher, aluminum tanks are used for acid transport, including organic acids like acetic acid:
http://tinyurl.com/kmcqkl
You may have to scroll down a few lines after you click the link.
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 10:19:02 -0700 (PDT), mike

How many boats have you restored, repaired or built from scratch?
Just curious.
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On Jul 22, 10:26 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

How is that relevant? Further, it appears this tangent is kinda moot, since the most common silicone sealant (GE Silicone II) doesn't release acid during cure:
http://tinyurl.com/mc95mj
"Product releases methanol and ammonia during curing"
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 10:40:55 -0700 (PDT), mike

Silicone sealant is a lousy adhesive. The OP is looking for an adhesive/sealant, not just a sealant. He has already tried something that didn't hold well in this application. It is for a "client", so I'm basing my advice on the theory that he wants to only do this once, and get it right.
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On Jul 22, 11:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Lousy? It may not be equivalent to welding, but for goodness sakes, they mount undermounted sinks with silicone sealant (sometimes marketed as an adhesive). It may well be enough for application in mind. But that's the OP's call.
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 11:32:41 -0700 (PDT), mike

Lousy!
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On Jul 22, 2:22 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Wait a minute - just a second ago you were arguing that 5200 was a bad choice as it was permanent. Arguments go a lot smoother if you pick a side and stick to it! ;)
R
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 11:43:06 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

This subject may be too complicated for you. Maybe you should wait until something simpler comes along. ;)
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On Jul 22, 2:46 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Gluing aluminum to glass is complicated...? I don't think so. I was kind of hoping that you would ask me the question about working on boats and my experience, but you didn't. Playing favorites I guess. :)~
I'm of the opinion that if it says 3M on the package, it's good stuff. You stated, unequivocally, that silicone is a lousy adhesive. What about 3M Marine Grade Silicone Sealant do you not like for the OP's application?
R
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 14:30:02 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

The OP has already unsuccessfully bonded these two pieces of a shower for a client. Saying 3M on tha package is a good start, but 3M makes an awful lot of products because they know that one size does not fit all. A good craftsman knows his tools. What I don't like about 3M marine grade silicone sealant for the OP's application is that Silicone is a very weak adhesive. It is really more of a filler for bedding hardware, with enough adhesive properties to make a fairly good seal. It's not intended to bond things together in a structural sense, which is what is required for the OP's application.
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Considering acidic soda pop is stored in aluminum cans for months and years at a time, I wouldn't worry too much about it. That aluminum oxide layer on the surface will hold up just fine.
-- obviously you've never stored soda in cans in your pantry for 6 months to a year. i can tell you from bitter experience, that yes, they do leak over time, lose their carbonation, and occasionally when we find a can a couple years old in the back behind everything, it may even be empty and still be factory sealed, and a really bad gooey mess underneath it.
it only takes a pinhole in the coating for this to occur.
regards, charlie
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On Tue, 21 Jul 2009 15:39:01 -0700 (PDT), mike

Soda cans are lined with plastic.
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http://www.thistothat.com/cgi-bin/glue.cgi?lang=en&this=Glass&that=Metal
Someone mentioned 3M 4200, which is almost as strong as 5200 but sets faster - it still takes a long time to cure and there are better choices is you have to get the shower back into service ASAP.
On of your main concerns will be preventing mold from taking hold, and for that reason I'd stay away from foam double-stick tape.
R
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On Tue, 21 Jul 2009 15:24:23 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

I suggested 3M 4200. 3M 5200 would be a bad choice. 3M 4200 would be perfect, as this is precisely the sort of thing it was designed to do. There is a fast curing version of 4200 called "Fast Cure 4200"
Tack free in 1-2 hours and fully cured in 24.
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On Jul 21, 7:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I just checked the 3M web site, and they mention 24-48 hours for a full cure in one place and 24 hours in another for the Fast Cure 4200. I didn't know that they now made a Fast Cure 5200 as well - that is listed as a full cure in 24 hours as well. Either one would be an excellent choice. Thanks for the correction.
R
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