Gluing a Toilet Tank

A female friend managed to break-off a chunk of her toilet tank. I checked and it's a 3.5 gallon tank that is no longer made - the manufacturer tells me that the 1.6 gallon tanks out there won't work with the bowl and that I should replace the toilet. The water level in the tank is below the chunk broken off and the one piece that's broken off is clean. The piece is pretty big but when I put it in place on the tank, it looks good. Can I try gluing this back on and if so what glue do I use??? The break is on the sidee of the toilet tank facing the bath and there's a sliding glass door there so no one will reach see the crack.
Appreciate any help!
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Glue it, get a waterproof glue
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DangerMan wrote:

projects has a fetish with the tape and everything he has is taped... silver tape covered slipper.. his metal walker is covered with tape... his belt is covered with tape.. his old tv set is covered with tape... his door knob on the front door is covered with tape.... his eye glasses. you name it, he has it covered with tape... did not see the inside of his home other than through the front door, but bet he even has tape in the bathroom....
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DangerMan wrote:

Sure you can "glue" it. I suggest a white silicone sealer. The silicone should hold it on and the white color should help hide the crack.
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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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DangerMan wrote:

I'd suggest using 5 minute epoxy, but make sure the edges of the break are good and dry before you glue it. Your female friend probably has some nail polish remover around which you can use that to wipe off the epoxy which squeezes out on the outside while it's still "wet".
Now tell us how she managed to bust her toilet tank. Was she hiding things inside it and dropped the lid on the tank while getting at the stuff? <G>
Jeff
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Don't use 5 minute epoxy! It's not water proof. Use a water proof epoxy.
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Rich wrote:

You are correct Rich, and I know that it's not waterproof, but it is highly *water resistant". The OP specified that the break was above the waterline, so I figured the 5 minute stuff would be easy for him to get even in most chain drug stores, and would be good enuf.
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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Generally,the longer the curing time,the stronger the epoxy. I'd use a thin epoxy like RAKA,West system,or System Three with silica thickener added.(mainly because I already have some around) The thin epoxy will soak into the porous porcelain and give a better bond. Both are boat-building epoxies,made for use in water.
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Jim Yanik
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Actually, she say's it's all my fault. We were in Home Depot where I was purchasing a set of tank bolts and washers and a gasket to repair a leak in my home toilet. (Some of you may have read my series of messages about the tank bolt leak -- took me almost a week to get those fabric washers snugged down enough to stop leakage around the tank bolts.) She said they she had a similar problem and she'd like to try the repair herself. A kind Home Depot employee took her over to a toilet display and walked her through the repair in about a minute. So she bought bolts, washers and gasket and headed home. Took her about two weeks to get up nerve ... she drained the tank, removed the bolts, and picked up the tank turning a little too quickly and smashing top of the tank against her vanity. As mentiioned, it's a 3.5 gallon tank and cannot be replaced. Hence our plans to glue. This time, she wants me there to help.
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I'd recommend epoxy (from experience also with a toilet tank). 5 minite variety is fine. The epoxy will give a pretty good structural bond. I can't say the same about silicone. I can't speak to super glue other than to say I always get it all over me.

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JMagerl wrote:

I would agree if this was a structural part. Re-reading the original, it is not 100% clear, but I was assuming it was not a structural part. Your point is well taken and if it is a structural part, I would second the epoxy idea. I also suggest making sure the epoxy used will stand up to water.

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Go to a marine supply store and buy a tube of 3M 5200. Ask at the counter. Everybody with a boat knows what it is. It can repair boat hulls below the waterline, and once cured, it is virtually impossible to undo anything bonded with it.
BB
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Regular epoxy. Don't use fast-cure (5-minute, 1-minute) epoxy because it's unforgiving when mixed in the wrong proportions, but with any epoxy, mix it thoroughly. Clean off the parts with alcohol before applying the epoxy, and apply it to both surfaces. After pressing the parts together and temporarily taping them in place, any excess epoxy can be cleaned off with alcohol.
Do NOT use super glue, silicone sealer, or caulk because they won't stick well. Epoxy is waterproof and works very well on ceramics.
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For a $100 toilet I would replace it! American Standard makes a toilet that will flush anything you can fit in it! Check Home Depot. Fix it if you want, but I would toss it! Greg
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In about 1965, not too long after moving into the house I am now in the process of selling, my father broke the porcelain tank lid in half on one of the house's 2 toilets (don't ask me how, maybe mom conked him on the head with it ;-). He glued it with epoxy, which held until just recently when I replaced the toilet. At that time, 40 years later, out of curiosity I attempted to break the joint. The lid broke partially along the joint and partially in an unbroken area. Not bad for a 39 cent repair. My guess is if anything epoxy has improved since then, try a high strength non-quick set variety.
Dan
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Glue it with epoxy. Wipe the extra glue off immediately after assembly and you'll hardly see the crack.
Bob
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