glueing together the two parts of a Formica counter, and the end pieces

glueing together the two parts of a Formica counter, and the end pieces
I think I wish now I had just ordered the thing assembled, but being the devoted DIYer, I bought a formica counter in two pieces, for an L-shaped counter.
The assembly kit, with the turnbolts, came with powdered glue to mix up, to glue the two pieces together.
Is this the best to use, or should I use TiteBond III or Elmers Furniture Glue (I think it is called. Tan in a squeeze bottle) or even Elmers white glue.
It seems like a pitfall would be not mixing the powdered glue to the right thickness, and that using liquid glue would avoid that. And I'm guessing they include it just because it packs flat and doesn't harden even if it takes years to sell. That it's not the best glue, just the best for them to sell in this case.
Also I have to glue on end pieces, but I forget now if they have adhesive already, or what.
ANYTHING ELSE I SHOULD KNOW ABOUT GLUING TOGETHER THE COUNTER?
Thanks.
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mm wrote:

I suggest using what they provided.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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mm wrote:

Since you have the turnbolts I wouls schmear the two mating surfaces with clear silicone. Tighten the bolts and clean up the excess with vinegar. Also schmear up around the cutout for the sink and primer underneath especially if you have a dishwasher.
Most of the end pieces I have seen are "iron-on" using a heat activated glue. carefuly sand the edges after you put them on so you have a slight bevel to prevent chipping.
Don't use your cordless drill to screw into the countertop through the flimsy, easily bent corner brackets of your cabinets. Do it by hand-much safer.
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The sink hole, ok, but I'm influenced by the other two posts to stay with the stuff they gave me.

Thank you, I will do that.

I'll do that too. Hadn't thought of these things.
Thanks a lot
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mm wrote:

If you do go with the stuff they gave when you are all done run masking tape down either side of the joint about an 1/8" to either side. Then run a bead of clear silicone and force it into the joint with a putty knife. Pull up the tape and wipe with vinegar.
You are bound to have at least one spot that isn't sealed completely and a little bit of water goes a long way in destroying a countertop.
When I put in self-rimming sinks I load up on the silicone also. It is a PITA cleaning up the squeeze out but a lot better than water swelling your counter.
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mm wrote:

The manufacturer has supplied a highly water resistant glue, possibly like the thermosets that used to be popular in boat building in the past. It will work just fine if you use sufficient water to make a nice slurry. The only thing that would work better would be a slow cure two part epoxy.

Have you asked your supplier? End pieces can be installed with contact cement.

Since it has to be absolutely flat. prepare the space where you will do the work (lay down a poly film to catch glue drips) and do a pre assembly checking for flatness and shimming the pieces as needed. Then glue it up, recheck for flat and let it cure. Good luck.
Joe
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OK, the glue it is then. Thanks and thanks to Joe!

Hehe. I'll do everything you suggest. All this above is why I should have let them do it. It was twice as much per foot, but I think I wouldn't have had to buy as many feet, only the ones I was using.
(I thought about covering another table with the left-over piece, but it would mean recutting the table itself to make it less deep! It wouldn't look good next to the other table.)

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The glue is also acting as a sealer against water.I'm sure you have seen where the joints expand from water penetrating. As mentioned fit everything up first. Also the back splashes will have to be scribed to fit the wall. There is nothing worse than section with a wide bead of caulking to hide a bad fit. It's a bit of work to install them just think everything out. As for the end caps I prefer contact cement also a router laminate trim bit is sure nice for the ends. Plus a fine file to takes care of the laminate overhang on the end caps, take your time using the file keep feeling the edge as you go.
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On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 01:44:42 GMT, "Sacramento Dave"

Reordered to put important stuff first.

The laminate (the top plastic layer?) is going to overhand the end caps? Even though I cut the laminate at the same time and length I cut the wood?
I haven't unwrapped the endcaps, but I figured they overlap the main piece of laminate.

Scribed and cut, you mean, with a sabre saw? It worked well for cutting the whole piece, but there isn't much for the saw to sit on, on the backsplash.

The wall bends there, quite a bit. I bought a 4x8 foot sheet of some white stuff to make it easier to wash and flatter. Actually the counter I could do in a rather short time, but I know putting slats/lath? behind this thing of the right thickness is going to take a while. This will push the whole thing forward a half inch, so the sink drain may have to be adjusted. I have a garbage disposal and I guess the trap rotates so that should do it, I think.

That's what started all this. I had had a gallon plastic bottle of distilled water for years, sitting on the cement floor of the basement. I took it up stairs for one night, and on that night, almost half the gallon drained out and my formica swelled.
I might have lived with that but once it opened up between the front piece and the top, of course the swelling spread. The new stuff is one piece, from the rear or the back spash to the front of the counter, down the front and backwards from the front, and I think up again maybe. So the water if there ever is any again** should drip off the front and never make it to the wood-like stuff.
**plus it rises up near the front edge, so it should make a lake before it spills over.
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If the powdered glue is plastic resin glue, it will perform very well in this application and is highly water resistant as well. It also requires good ventilation when used, after the water is mixed with it the fumes can be quite nasty; formaldehyde, IIRC.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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wrote:

Think about the alignment. If you have a biscuit (plate) joiner that would work well. Take the time to do a dry fit and fuss with the joint--when you apply the adhesive it may be too late. I'd use the glue that came with the kit and follow the directions carefully.
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