Glue sheetrock to masonry wall?

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I am thinking about adding a layer of sheetrock to an existing party/dividing wall that is between my house and the house next door. I am trying to decide what is the best way to attach the sheetrock to the existing wall.
The party/dividing wall is above grade in the living area of the house and is made of bricks/masonry covered by what seems like either mortar or the type of "rough coat" material that goes under plaster. I am not sure exactly what it is, but it seems softer than mortar. On top of that is a few coats of latex paint. The existing wall is in excellent shape -- flat, solid, no cracks, etc.
My question is, how should I attach the new sheetrock to the existing wall? Can I just glue it to the existing wall or do I need to use some type of fasteners in addition to glue? Maybe just glue it and only use a few screws to hold it in place while the glue dries? I haven't tried seeing if sheetrock screws will go into the wall yet, but I can try that. Or, maybe some kind of Tapcon screws would be needed -- but I'd like to avoid having to do a lot of drilling etc. for a whole wall.
Also, what type of glue should I be using? I've seen Liquid Nails, LockTite, etc. but don't know which to choose.
The property is a house that I own that will be rented out. The reason that I am thinking of adding a layer of sheetrock to the party/dividing wall is to try to help reduce the sound transmission between the two properties. I do know that just adding sheetrock won't do too much, but I am hoping it will at least add a little more density to the wall to cut down the sound transmission at least a little.
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Typically what is done is to install 1x3 or 1x4 furring strips to the wall and then to attach the drywall to those. That also would allow you to put some thin foam insulation in the spaces between the furring strips.
nate
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N8N wrote:

Thanks.
Sorry, but I forgot to add that there is no room to do any kind of build-out or to add furring strips, etc. Adding just the sheetrock will already be pushing the limit a little due to doors, trim, kitchen cabinets, etc. that are along or adjacent to the existing wall.
So, my only option is to glue or otherwise attach sheetrock directly to the existing wall.
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If you feel that is your only option, what exactly are you asking?
Sound transmission works via a few different mechanisms, so the first thing to do is to determine which direction the sound will be going, and what acoustic frequency you are trying to reduce. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_transmission_class
This site has a number of products which might give you some ideas. http://www.silentsource.com/index.html Homasote is a good and inexpensive acoustical treatment that is readily available and easy to work with. Covering it with fabric or heavy-bodied wallpaper would take care of the aesthetics.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Here is eaxactly what I am asking (from my original post):
My question is, how should I attach the new sheetrock to the existing wall? Can I just glue it to the existing wall or do I need to use some type of fasteners in addition to glue? Maybe just glue it and only use a few screws to hold it in place while the glue dries? I haven't tried seeing if sheetrock screws will go into the wall yet, but I can try that. Or, maybe some kind of Tapcon screws would be needed -- but I'd like to avoid having to do a lot of drilling etc. for a whole wall.
Also, what type of glue should I be using? I've seen Liquid Nails, LockTite, etc. but don't know which to choose.
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I don't think the sound reduction will warrant the effort, but, be that as it may, you can use joint compound to glue up the drywall or pretty much any adhesive caulk you want (if you use enough of it). You will need to rig up something to brace the boards against the wall so you won't get any bulging or have a wavy surface. Check out the USG web site for specifics on bonding with joint compound. Setting- type compound will shorten the required bracing time significantly.
R
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wrote:

I don't think the sound reduction will warrant the effort, but, be that as it may, you can use joint compound to glue up the drywall or pretty much any adhesive caulk you want (if you use enough of it). You will need to rig up something to brace the boards against the wall so you won't get any bulging or have a wavy surface. Check out the USG web site for specifics on bonding with joint compound. Setting- type compound will shorten the required bracing time significantly.
R
Ditto to the above...Done it many times..I use USG Durabond 45 Setting Type Joint Compound to glue it on...Just make SURE you have EVERYTHING ready to go as the compound will set in 45 minutes..ie. tools bracing , help , ect..They do have longer times available (90,220) but 45 minutes is enough if your ready and you'll have to do it in steps as well so the wait till you can go again is short....5/8 works better as it is more ridgid and won't look wavy if you don't brace it good...HTH...Oh , it won't make a lick of difference on your sound problem...But heh , it's your baby...
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----------------
Interesting. I had never heard of using joint compound for something like this. I have used the 45-minute setting type, which I like, but not for that. I'm assuming some kind of notched thin set type of trowel would work best to create an even coating.
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Nah...I mix it to about a medium consistancy and I trowl it on with my 10 inch knife but I can get it pretty good by eye...A knotch trowl would probably work better for a DIYer though...Check the USG website on uses for Durabond setting type compound....It can even be used to patch concrete above grade and as a floor leveler....LOL...HTH...
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In wrote:

Glue is good; but sheetrock won't help sound transmission.
Can I just glue it to the existing wall or do I need to use

Recommendations are to use ferring strips. You could even make them 2 x if you want room for more insulator material.
Maybe just glue it and

Braces work better; the glues grab quickly. I

Go to store; read labels. Seems like Liquid Nails said it's good for concrete and I know there are several others. Read & pick.
Twayne
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typed:

I just found this online:
http://www.greengluecompany.com/ .
It "only" costs about $15 per tube, and they "only" recommend using 1 to 3 tubes per 4x8 sheet of drywall! :-)
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In wrote:

Forgot all about homasote; good catch if you can only use 1 x for the ferring.
Twayne
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wrote:

But homasote is less forgiving and more easily damaged than even drywall.
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On Jan 7, 8:26pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Can you do something on the other side of the wall????
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wrote:

Can you do something on the other side of the wall????
Did you even bother reading the first senrence in the O P ???? I suppose he could buy the house next door...LOL...
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He could own the entire building. He may be the landlord.
It would be very unusual to buy half a house, and rent it out.
Personally, though, he is wasting his time. Unless he adds a thickness of sound-deadening matieral between the masonry and the drywall, all he's doing is giving Home Depot more of his hard earned money.
However, if he insists on going forward with this asinine idea, he can just use liquid nails or equivalent construction adhesive.
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On Fri, 8 Jan 2010 11:46:29 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Happens all the time. Think semi-detached homes. Or 1/3, 1/4, 1/6 etc. Think urban row-housing. Or 1/20 or more - think Condo complex.

And give home depot a lot more money than he would using the "right" material - the setting compound.
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wrote:

I wonder if the sheetrock would absorb moisture if it was glued?
We used a plastic laminate in a nursing home kitchen. You can get them textured and they apply directly to the wall.
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In wrote:

It might, along the bottom if not properly prepared; depends. The wall with open space on each side shouldn't in general be a big problem, but ... that's why they always recomment using ferring strips. Always possible to use a vapor barrier too if it's a worry; plastic sheeting is cheap.
Twayne
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In wrote:

Sheetrock isn't going to help noticeably I don't think. Just work around the interference things, and if it's a closet on the wall, also put foam inside those. It's not that much more work.
If you use 2 x instead of 1 x you'll be able to use a much more effective (thicker)foam for the sound deadening. Don't forget the ceiling, depending on how things are constructed; especially if it's a hung ceiling - noise will come that way, too. Be meticulous about plugging any holes thru the wall. Doors, windows at each end shouldn't be a problem; just work around them.
Twayne
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