Glue for scarf on garden hoe

I have 3 hoes. I'm not particularly tall (5' 10.5"), but it seems that they make hoes for people 5' 8" or less, because two of mine make my back ache, having to bend over so much. I scarfed an extension on one a few years ago and attempted a scarf on another hoe recently. The glue was 1 hour epoxy I've had around for many years to which I'd added some steel filings from my grinder. The reasoning was that the filings would make the bond tougher. Well, the glue failed while using the hoe, so I ground off the glue and tried another glue I had on hand, J-B Weld. I've had the tubes for probably around 3 years. The packaging claims it's the "Worlds finest cold weld" etc. Well, I'm using the hoe a couple of weeks after this and the scarf breaks again!!
I never had trouble with the scarf on the other hoe. The angle is about the same, around 30 degrees (guesstimating), the length of the scarf being close to 3x the diameter of the handle.
Better glue?
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Musicant wrote:

You're using your hoes wrong. Next time, have *them* do the bending over.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2009 1:28 PM snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net spake thus:

Ugly, but possibly structurally sound idea: put a couple of hose clamps over the scarf joint?
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
spake thus:

How 'bout a length of light-weight pipe of the correct bore size, drilled at each end for counter-sunk screws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote: ...

...
Possibly; the metal in the one experiment was bad idea for starters.
If you can make the surfaces adequately flat for a good glue joint you could add glue surface by also make a saw kerf and fit a spline vertically although a good joint should hold--a good glue joint is as strong as the surrounding wood.
I'd use the Titebond Type III waterproof glue since a hoe is used outside but not expected to be subjected to immersion.
In testing it has more strength than the resorcinals ("Gorilla" glue types) by a significant margin.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote: :... : :> Better glue? :... : :Possibly; the metal in the one experiment was bad idea for starters. : :If you can make the surfaces adequately flat for a good glue joint you :could add glue surface by also make a saw kerf and fit a spline :vertically although a good joint should hold--a good glue joint is as :strong as the surrounding wood. : :I'd use the Titebond Type III waterproof glue since a hoe is used :outside but not expected to be subjected to immersion. : :In testing it has more strength than the resorcinals ("Gorilla" glue :types) by a significant margin.
I posted a thread here on 07/12/2009:
Subject: Glue for scarf on garden hoe
Got some good responses (10-12 or so). I've been waiting for warm weather to try a plastic resin glue I have lying around, but it hasn't come (supposed to be at least 70 F to work OK). I am wondering reading the thread again if I shouldn't try something else. I like the post above, especially the spline idea, which is easily implemented with a thin bladed saw and a rectangular slug of steel, and some decent glue. A 48+ hour epoxy would probably suffice, but think getting that Titebond III might not be a bad idea. Does Home Depot carry it? A decent sized hardware store?
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Musicant wrote:

Yes & yes but Titebond II would be entirely adequate. BTW - in reference to the post to which you replied - Gorilla glue is not resorcinol.
You would be better off using a steel dowel rather than a spline.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I realize you are already into your project and probably already have the scarf joints cut, but aemiejers has it right - it's a lot easier to just buy the correct hoe at a store for men. The hoes that landscapers use are almost a foot longer than the homeowner variety.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dan-
Having lengthened and repaired a number of garden tools over the years (more of a "can it be done / an academic exercise" than a practical solution" ..here are my thoughts & expereinces.
Wood glues (Titebonds, woodworkers glue) are better than epoxies in this application. A 3:1 scarf is too steep, something more like 6:1 is better A few #6 SS screws screws will help.
Buying a tool with the right length handle makes more sense. I assume you;re wanting like a 60" handle rather than a 48" handle? Buying a replacement handle is a faster, cheaper, easier solution. And at this point it is probably way better way to go than a new long handled hoe.
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Musicant ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) wrote:
-snip-

I'd find a long handled hoe--- They are out there, just not at your big box store.
But if you want to scarf a joint that will take that kind of abuse I'd start with a scarf 5-7 times as long as the diameter. Then I'd use Weldwood Resorcinol glue-- I did a scarf on a 30 yr old gun'l of a rowboat and beat hell out of it for another decade. . . then quit using the boat 15 yrs ago and left it in the weeds. The scarf joints are still holding.
http://www.acehardwaresuperstore.com/weldwood-marine-resorcinol-glue-p-652.html?refB
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Go to a better store, and buy a real hoe- they aren't that expensive. A lumberyard for the trades, not a big box, or an industrial supply, or even a real farm/ag supply store. Hoes in 'garden centers' and big boxes are mainly sized for women, because they are who do most recreational gardening. I'm 6'3", and also have trouble with most yard tool handles being too damn short.
Or if there is an OLD hardware store near you, they may have full-length replacement handles.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Musicant wrote:

Better joint. You need one that is *much* longer. Reinforcement wouldn't hurt either...either some wood/brass/steel pins/dowels or serve the joint with heavy twine and saturate that with epoxy. And forget the steel filings and JB Weld...either plain epoxy or type 2 yellow glue should work well.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Musicant ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) wrote in

No,it's just a filler.It actually weakens the bond. If you want to epoxy wood,you need a THIN epoxy like a boat-building epoxy such as West Systems,RAKA,or System Three.The epoxy has to soak into the wood.you use thin epoxy on the wood surfaces,then use wood flour or fumed silica as a thickener,to fill gaps in the joint. You can't clamp too hard or it squeezes out too much epoxy and starves the joint. Now,if you could glue a metal tube over the scarf joint,epoxy would be good.
IMO,good wood glues are better than epoxy for this application. Use a waterproof wood glue.

epoxies take a few weeks to gain full strength.

and a longer scarf, about 4" long.

www.systemthree.com;
you can download their Epoxy Book,VERY informative about using epoxies and fillers.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Buy a longer pole at your local Ace hardware..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.