Glue For Grandson's Wooden Toy Guitar Repair ?

Hi,
Want to repair my Granson's toy guitar which is coming apart. "Gentle" is not his middlename.
All wooden.
Is Titebond II still about the "best" glue to use for something like this ? Or,...?
Epoxy better ?
BTW: How well does epoxy usually work on wood ?
Any rules of when to use it on wood, and when not ?
Thanks, Bob
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On 3/12/2014 1:44 PM, Bob wrote:

I'm sure others will correct me, but.... I've had some success with gorilla glue on wood repairs. I've had to wet the wood, apply, clamp, and wipe the excess ooze in about five or ten minutes. Leave the repair clamped over night.
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I use normal Elmers wood glue on guitars. I think you want the bond to fail first and not tear the wood apart so you can repair again if needed.

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The wood is cracked or separated in the middle of a piece of wood?
As opposed to two pieces of wood, maybe with glue still on them, being separated.
I'm going to assume the first.
If it's the second with glue still on them, and you can't scrape off the glue and rough up the wood a little bit, I wouldnt' call the pieces wood anymore. The outer surface is more important than what's underneath it.

No. I wouldn't use that.

Who knows. I've always had fine results with white glue, Elmers usually but some other brand when I found it in my brother's house.
And I've bought and used Titebond II when I heard it was v. good for something that would get wet. Maybe it was outside. It was fine, but I"m sure I'd already used Elmers for fence pickets that get rained on and it was fine too.
Maybe some really hard wood would need something other than white but that's just speculation.

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Define "coming apart".

Like what?
Details please...
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I use Titebond for all carpentry and cabinet work, with new wood. I like to use the non-waterproof type, in case the work has to be disassembled for some reason. For something old, other porous surfaces, or for tropical hardwoods I like to use 5-minute epoxy. For non-porous surfaces I use cyanoacrylate ("super glue"), but that only works well when there's very good contact and the materials are non-porous.
It depends, though, on what you're gluing. If you have a large surface with a fresh break then Titebond might work well. If you have very little surface then an epoxy might be better.
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FWIW, here's a work around for that.
When I was a photographer I also sold frames. Big frames, 16 x 20 - 40 x 60. I had no room to store moldings so I used a chop service...tell them the size and thay chop the pieces on a guillotine, send them to you and you assemble.
The wood, of course, is porous; the miters were fairly close fitting and but not very smooth. To get them smooth, I rubbed a piece of chalk over them, gently blew off excess. When the CA is applied, it soaks into the chalk and bonds it to the wood; the chalk is also now non-porous.
I used this technique on every frame I ever made over a 15 year period, never used nails, none ever came apart.
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If I wanted the repaired joint to be as invisible as possible, I'd use white wood glue, like Elmer's or Weldbond. The advantage of white wood glues is that they dry clear, and that makes for the most invisible repairs. Clamp the joint tight, wipe up any white wood glue that oozes out of the joint with a damp rag or sponge, and allow to cure.
If I wanted the strongest repair I could get, I would use LePage's PL Premium construction adhesive. PL Premium now also comes in a high tack variety that gives a better initial grab, but you still want to clamp the joint tight as it cures. PL Premium is a moisture cure polyurethane, and because there's always some moisture in wood, it works particularily well on wood. To store a partially used tube of PL Premium, just squeeze a little out so that you can grab onto something, and store it in your freezer. When you want to use it again, take it out of the freezer, put it in your caulking gun and apply pressure to it. Then pull out the cured stuff at the end, and it should start to flow again, but very slowly. Allow time for it to warm up, and it should be ready to use again.
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On 3/12/2014 12:44 PM, Bob wrote:

...
All depends on what's broken and how...
<http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/repair/acoustic-guitar/glue.php
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