gloves for lacquer thinner

I bought a gallon copper pitcher on eBay. It had been lacquered, and it was tarnishing under the lacquer. The item is a bit big to boil off the lacquer, plus I don't know what the baking soda will do to the tin lining. So I figured I'd simply use lacquer thinner. There being a bit of area needing to be cleaned I figured I'd stop at my Lowes and buy some gloves. The problem is none of the gloves they sell are recommended for lacquer thinner!
Back at home on the web I learn that laminate gloves are the only type for lacquer thinner and that they can only be bought in packs of 10 gloves for $46-100! All I need in one glove.
What are my options here for hand protection?
Don. http://paleodiet.com/definition.htm (e-mail link at page bottom).
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Don Wiss wrote:

Wipe on, wipe off, wash hands.
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

I've used lots of lacquer thinner with no gloves. Use brushes with handles, or tongs to hold your steelwool. Rinse well if you get some on you.
If you think you'll still be at risk, use leather gloves & don't let them get saturated.
Jim
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http://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&channel=s&hl=en&source=hp&biw=922&bih=517&q=rubber+gloves&btnG=Google+Search#q=chemical+gloves&hl=en&newwindow=1&safe=off&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=s&prmd=ivns&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=htFkTqG6J6XZ0QGLwqiTCg&ved=0CI0BEK0E&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=b21aeac2d6e9f9cb&biw=922&bih=517
http://tinyurl.com/chemgloves -----
- gpsman
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Don-
Baking soda solution will not harm the tin lining.
I've had good luck with nitrile for lacquer thinner for the few times I used it but.....

well-defined. Different manufacturers use different formulations. <<<
the batch you got probably has some components that attack nitrile (ketones)
YEARS ago I had these heavy reusable "rubber gloves" (yellow 'rubber' with a cloth lining), they seemed bullet proof. I used them for all sort of solvents & chemicals; gasoline, MEK, acetone, copper based wood preservative, MC based stripper. Good performance with all, don't know what they were. I gave them to a former neighbor when my chemical usage waned and he was using a copper based wood preservative bare handed.
check out
http://www.mcmaster.com/#rubber-gloves/=dxhvv5 click through on the solvent resistant gloves
there is an extensive chemical compatibility chart (too long for me to wade through)
figure on spending about $30 for a pair but they will last for a VERY long time.
cheers Bob
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I think it is nitrile rubber gloves that are recommended for solvents that might permeate other rubbers.
I would not use my bare hands but might get by with tongs or the like.
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No. Nitrile gloves are specifically not recommended for ketones, which are in lacquer thinner.

It is way too big for tongs.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

I'd clean something big like that just as I clean auto parts. Put it in a wide shallow pan and work your solvent with a brush. All kinds of brushes to use, but I use a stiff sash brush the most. Some auto stores sell them. If it's too big for a pan, lay it on a bed of rags. A brush can splash, so it's best to wear eye protection. Take all the normal flammable precautions. No need to get your hands/gloves soaked in solvent. Just usually makes the job go faster. Tongs are for pulling dozer track shoes from a furnace or brats from the grill.
--Vic
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The poly-ethylene gloves should work fine with solvents. (Cheap medical type) Maybe doubled, because they're thin.
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You write should. You mean this is just a hunch?
I found this chart which has acetone listed: http://www.aps.anl.gov/Safety_and_Training/User_Safety/gloveselection.html
Poly-ethylene is not listed. I don't know what gloves are made from it.
These are the ingredients and their rating:
        Neoprene    Natural Latex    Butyl        Nitrile                  or Rubber            Latex
Acetone        G        VG        VG        P Ethyl Acetate    G        F        G        F Methanol    VG        VG        VG        VG Toluene        F        P        P        F
Now I see they also listed laquer thinners:         G        F        F        P
Which has neoprene the best. Those Home Depot gloves recommened in a post above on a search for chemical gloves are neoprene.
Don. http://paleofood.com/kitchen-equipment.htm (e-mail at page bottom).
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I've found more charts. The best is the new Ansell Barrier laminate gloves. I can buy one glove here: http://www.gemplers.com/product/182013/Ansell-Barrier-Chemical-Resistant-Multi-hazard-Gloves?sku 2013
Another chart is inside a frame at this site: http://www.mcmaster.com / The best lacquer thinner gets in the chart is a "B-Moderate EffectSome chemical resistance. Some performance degradation. Shortening of product life." And the only ones to get a B is: neoprene (I bought a pair at Home Depot) and one of their three polyethylene gloves, their 5582T7, which is a Disposable Polyethylene Glove Powder Free, 1.25 Mils Thick, 12" Length, Clear; sold only in boxes of 100.
It got dark by the time I got back from Home Depot. I will try the neoprene gloves out tomorrow. I'm sure they will be fine. Lacquer comes off readily and I should be able to finish quickly.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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So...is this a way of saying I might be right? Or a partial apology? I was just trying to suggest what I thought would work.
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Don Wiss wrote:

You could spray your hands with PAM. It works for latex paints. Other than that, I don't know.
Why do you think you need hand protection for lacquer thinner?
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Why do you think you need hand protection for lacquer thinner?
http://www.dosha.org/msds/Lacquer%20Thinner.pdf
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DD_BobK wrote:

Okay, that says lacquer thinner is "irritating to... skin."
So is a mosquito.
Note that lacquer thinner is "IRRITATING" not "harmful" or "toxic" or any other appellation used for eyes, lungs, or internal organs.
I do note that this product is known to cause reproductive toxicity in California, which is not a bad thing.
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On 9/6/2011 7:08 AM, HeyBub wrote:

I use lacquer thinner to wash paint off my hands. I've been dipping my hands in lacquer thinner off and on for 50 years. I got it in my eyes, but never drank or inhaled it. Well, might have inhaled a few gallons painting cars and such.

Amen to that.
--
Jack
Don't worry about your health... It'll go away!
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On 9/5/2011 7:01 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

Use paint remover. Works fine. Clean off with very fine steel wool and re-lacquer.
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On 9/6/2011 8:12 AM, Norminn wrote:

If you use paint remover, wear eye protection. Get that crap in your eyes and you are in for a bear of a ride...
--
Jack
Bad decisions make good stories.
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