glazing putty over primer or paint?

I'm rehabbing a window. I stripped it down and painted the whole sash with an oil-based primer. I will be painting with an acrylic latex. Should I install the window over the primer, and then top coat after, or should I put the latex on first and then install the glass?
The only part of the window where this matters is the recess for the glass and glazing putty.
thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

I believe that you are supposed to paint over the glazing putty after the job is complete. If you want to give the window extra protection by all means paint the recess for the glass before you assemble it, but it still should get a coat of paint after you're done.
nate
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On Jun 2, 6:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

Glass needs to be bedded in putty after priming the groove. Finish painting after putty has skinned over in a few weeks,
Joe
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Thanks Joe.
Nate, I see that what I wrote is a bit confusing.
I have the whole window primed with oil-based primer now. The finish coat will be a latex. I know I need to wait before painting the putty, but what I was looking for was whether to bed the glass on top of the primer, or to paint over the primer with the top coat before bedding the glass.
The rest of the window will get painted asap so I can hang it back up. I presume the putty can be outside while it cures?
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On Jun 2, 4:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@pookmail.com wrote:

There are a couple of ways to do this.
btw I've been futzing with wood framed windows for about 25 years.
The way I have settled on, after reading & trying, is ...on bare wood / stripped frames.......
the areas that will see glazing compound get a coat of shellac appropriately thinned....this is to seal the wood & keep the compound from losing solvent to the wood
the areas to be painted get primed, including the glazing compound but DAP33 (more or less the readily available) takes a LONG while (many days) to skin over / ready for primer
I switched to an organic linseed oil compound & complementary organic linseed oil paint that allows the compound to be painted immediately but this system is a bit "too far out there" for me to recommend
On bare wood the linseed oil paint is amazing / awesome, dries in a day, ready for recoat
but...........
over a "standard" oil base primer (like Zinseer High Hide Cover Stain) it takes a several days ..... :(
the stuff is really best on new or completely stripped or sanded old wood
so to simply answer your question.......
" Should I install the window over the primer, and then top coat after"
yes, install the glass over the primed frame; bed the glass in a thin layer of compound & then glaze the "front". A small diameter "worm" of compound placed in the glass recess will squish out and give you your thin layer of beding.
Do not paint with latex until after the window has been glazed.
cheers Bob
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Bob, thanks for all the details. I already have oil-base primer on this one but I have lots more to do... Couple more questions:
I presume it's no biggie to paint other areas of the window with latex before the glass goes in (e.g. front face, sides)? The reason is I don't have the glass yet but do have the paint so would like to move forward asap. I can mask the area that will get glaze so it doesn't get painted.
Also, is it ok to hang the window back up outside before the glaze is painted? IOW, will it stand up to the elements right away?
thx!
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On Jun 2, 8:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You could do the latex before the glass but it will get things a bit out of sequence...if oyu must paint only the "sides / faces" of the frame that dont get putty.
and you need to prime & a paint the putty anyway
I prefer to compeltely finish up a sash before I install it in the window frame. It allows me toget paint onto the glass a bit on both sides
cutting glass yourself is pretty easy with a bit of practice....get score it firmly, break it quick....do it like the outcome isnt that important, relax & go for it.
depends on where you are...as long you;re not going to get tons of rain the putty should be fine, sun exposure will speed skin formation
the way I close off the house when the sashes are out.... 1/4" plywood cut to fill the space or the window screen covered by taping on painters paper or plastic.
Roger;s post has a lot of good points...he, he...I forgot the glazers points
cheers Bob
wood framed windows are a lot of work
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My understanding was that the bed area of the sash should be: 1] "painted" with linseed oil over the raw wood, 2] a small bed of glazing compound should go between the frame and the glass, 3] push points should then be installed to hold the glass. 4] the finish layer of glazing compound should then be installed, 5] when the putty has skinned over, prime then paint. A small bead of paint should overcoat the putty on to the glass to effect a good seal.
The way it was explained to me is the linseed oil does a better job of sealing the wood so the wood does not suck the oils out of the putty and it does a superior job of putting a film between the putty and the wood when compared to paint.
I might stop by at the glass shop to as the expert just to be sure.
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Roger Shoaf

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