Glass top stove incident

I am a CNA for a home health agency and one of my clients left a bag of frozen veggies on the glass top stove and it mellted any ideas how to get the plastic stuff off [size:ee93037f27][/size:ee93037f27]
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Try a razor blade.
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Tom O'Connor wrote:

reheat and razor blade
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Or perhaps - reheat and paper towels. Or some combination. Followed by acetone.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

I'd use MEK after getting most of it off with the heat and razor blade approach. MEK will dissolve the plastic and should have no effect on the glass / ceramic top. I don't think acetone will do anything to most plastics.
Pete C.
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"Pete C." wrote:

Also, let the surface cool again before using any type of solvent on the remaining residue. If it's hot it can of course catch on fire, but even if it doesn't it will evaporate too fast to be useful if it's hot.
Pete C.
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I don't think either one will melt polyethylene. Go with mild heat and scraping
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It seems you are correct. While both Acetone and MEK take the printing off a bag in mere milliseconds, neither seem to have any effect on the underlying plastic.
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:

Those bags are polyethylene, so MEK won't dissolve it. It will however wreck just about any other plastic or paint finish in the kitchen, so don't use it. The razor blade will scratch the hell out of that shiny, expensive tempered-glass surface, so unless you know what you're doing, don't go crazy with that approach either.
I'd try a dishcloth dampened with one of those orange cleaners. Wet it good (but not dripping) then lay it over the plastic. Cover that with some foil or plastic to slow down evaporation and let it sit overnight. If that doesn't work try a buffing wheel with some damp baking soda as the "compound". You want to get at the soft plastic without scratching the much harder glass.
Good luck
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My fading recollection is that polyethylene has "no know solvents".
SJF
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Go to the local hardware store and get a scraper with a razor blade in it. This is what is reccommended for a cook top I have one and have had to scrape things off that have melted on such as styro foam plates, plastic strainers wrappers from packages. One probably came in the care kit instructions when they purchased it.
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I would try a steemer.
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