Glass block window in concrete


I am going to install a glass block window in my walkout concrete foundation (In a bath I'm remodeling) I have asked several local contractors for bids but it seems the job is too small for companies in my area. I've had a couple of handyman types out last month but none of these has even called back with estimates (We have called them but never recieved return calls) So...
I am very handy myself and I was mostly wanting a pro to save me the time and hassle. I'm doing a one block tall (8" by about 4' wide) window just to allow light into the room over the shower. I don't think I'll be running into load issues as I'll add a 2x psudo header under the base of the first floor wall of my single story house. Glass block will bridge between this and the concrete foundation.
Do I need more reinforcement? and any other advice on this would be great. I've also thought of deepening the window to 2 blocks (aprox16" still 4' wide) How badly would that effect the structure of my upper story?) I need to start soonish. as I've wasted 2 months on trying to get this done for me.
James Wulfsong
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On Feb 25, 12:06�pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Bath MUST then have exhaust fan!
should be easy to do, kinda a lego assembly add mortor
my mom changed her basement windows to glass block and caused mold mildew and moisture troubles, those tiny vents were a joke.
old folks like glass block thinking it secure, when a burglar is more likely to just kick in a door.
glass is mess, noisey and cuts the burglar.
at least provide ventilation, and it WILL be a issue at home resale time
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the glass block, under faux header or sill plate, unless the block will be surrounded by a steel frame. The usual cautions about putting wood in contact with concrete, and using jackposts and a temporary beam under the joists while you punch through the wall, apply. If you have never laid glass block, recommend you look at the plastic cheaters to get pretty joints- you lay it all up dry, the plastic doohickeys maintain the proper gap so it looks pretty, and then you tuckpoint it or grout it with mortar. Some people even skip the mortar, and just use a good grade of silicone caulk, but you will have mortar mixed anyway to clean up the hole you cut with proper trim blocks.
aem sends....
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On 25 Feb 2007 09:06:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

As AAM pointed out glass block is not structural so you need the same support you would have over a door or window. Precast concrete headers are pretty easy. The question is how you support all of this until you get the header in there. If you are in Florida you probably already have a poured tie beam but that is rare to unknown in the frozen north.
I am a rank amateur but I have been successful with glass block. (a few small windows, a 5'x5' bevelled bay window and a 5x6 shower enclosure) The trick for a newbee is don't try to do too many at once. Lay about 2 courses and get them straight, level and clean in a day. If that comes easy try 3. The spacers help but they are not a panacea. Blue painters tape is your friend. Mask the surface of the block before you start. It makes cleanup a WHOLE lot easier. Plan on wastinmg some mud getting the mix right. It will end up a bit dryer than you use for regular masonry units because they don't absorb any water.Getting the mortar right is important.
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