GHz vs MHz

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Is 333MHz the same as 3.33GHz
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JC wrote:

No. 3.3 Gigahertz = 3,330 Megahertz
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Thanks a bunch. And you guys close the doors over there, you're letting that cold air get down here to Columbus.
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On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 22:08:28 +0000, JC wrote:

Hey I'm an hour and a half north of you on I77 and 20 was the high here today :)
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wrote:

You should all close the door, it was 67 here today and I thought about putting on socks
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Meat Plow wrote:

I think he means a different Columbus (as in Columbus, TX.)
And for JC; The door is closed. It should be warming up tomorrow.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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No, 333 mHz is 1/10 of 3.33 gHz.
--

Christopher A. Young;
.
.

"JC" < snipped-for-privacy@imouttatown.net> wrote in message
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wrote:

And when I started in the business it 3.33GHz was called 3.33 Kilo Mega Cycles (kMC).
Looked around the web and got some hits. Back to 1955 where they are talking about an X-Band radar (10 kMc).
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/freeabs_all.jsp?arnumber 50306
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No. It's .333 gHz
--
:)
JR

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M = 1 million (1,000,000) G = 1 billion (1,000,000,000)
For completeness:
K = 1 thousand (1,000) T = 1 trillion (1,000,000,000,000)
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On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 19:18:46 -0600, Kenneth Porter

I want a T model...
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All this math makes my head hertz
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wrote:

"The smallest amount of transfer is one bit."
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And to really corn-fuse things, 1K isn't really 1,000 but 1,024 at least when talking bytes of computer memory or disk space. It is really 2 to the 10th power

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The abbreviation for that is KiB:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kibibyte
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On Wed, 19 Dec 2007 00:59:32 -0600, Kenneth Porter

Not to be confused with Kib (bits instead of bytes).

--
6 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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On Wed, 19 Dec 2007 00:59:32 -0600, Kenneth Porter

That sounds like something someone just came up with and is trying to get started. I understand the idea but I have never actually seen it used
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It used to matter if you used a lowercase K or uppercase K to indicate Kilo - one refers to 1000, the other 1024. Just don't ask me which was which.
:)
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A standard was to use a lowecase when referring to radio frequencies (kHz) and I think an upper for computer rates kbs.
I think generally accepted that K always = 1000 except when talking about memory.
1 Kbs (kilo bits per second) is still 1000.
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Kenneth Porter wrote:

And the basis for such dimension-ordering: engineering-notation for the exponent of 10, using increments of 3. (Vice plain scientific notation, where the exponent can be any integer.)
Ex: Real number (coefficient) * 10^exponent, where exponent is an integer in (... -12,-9,-6,-3,0,3,6,9,12, ...). And the coefficient is normalized to be greater than or equal to 1 and less than 1000.
High-school math/physics/chemistry.
John
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