GFI problem

Hi, I just replacd to wall sconces in our bathroom. The originals were ugly, however they always worked. I wired the new sconces the same way as the old. After I installed the first one I flipped the switch and voila the new fixture and the remaining old fixture worked. So I removed the last old fixture and installed the last new fixture. Flipped the switch and, nothing. I went down to check the breaker and it wasn't tripped. I checked the GFI in the bathroom and it hadn't tripped. There was no voltage at the switch. Finally I realized that a GFI outlet down in the basement was tripped. I reset it and tada, light. I tried them a little while later and you guessed it nothing. What would cause the GFI to trip when it never did with the old ones? These are wired the same. The only difference is that these fixtures can take up to a 100w bulb the old ones were only 50w. Thanks, Jeff
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Jeff: Simply put, GFIC devices "watch" the white wire (neutral wire) for excessive voltage. When voltage on return line (white wire) exceeds a preset level, it trips and turns off the power coming into the GFI on the hot (black wire) line.
How old is the GFI ? These things can be sensivtive. Ive seen flourescent lights trip them, and even brand new ones have to be re replaced because they tripped prematurely.
Also, the present GFI you have in place MAY be working properly, IF you have a "slight short" in those bath fixtures or wiring.
Good Luck, and please find problem, and dont be tempted to replace GFI with a standard receptical.
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That is incorrect. Lifted from Howstuffworks.com " A GFCI monitors the amount of current flowing from hot to neutral. If there is any imbalance, it trips the circuit. It is able to sense a mismatch as small as 4 or 5 milliamps, and it can react as quickly as one-thirtieth of a second. "
See http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/question117.htm for a complete explanation of how they work and what they do.
Steve B.
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On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 18:02:22 -0400, "Jeff Guay"

Theres a good chance that you either have a problem with your wiring or your fixture. Take the second fixture down and wirenut the loose wires then see if the problem repeats. If not check for stray strands of wire that might have been sticking out, You can also swap the fixtures to see if the problem stays with the one fixture or stays with the location.
Steve B.
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GFI outlet anymore, now that they cost only a few dollars. The only time I ever would is in kitchen situations, where the outlets are just a few feet apart.
The 20A version is not particularly cheap or as available as the 15A variety. That plus paying $12 for an receptacle made in China does bug me a bit. Not to mention that these things are huge and can't be put in most existing electrical boxes.
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I wonder about a partial short, from hot to ground. Check your wiring again, I don't think it is the more powerful bulb. You will probably have to do some detective work to narrow down the problem. Dissect the circuit back from the distal end to localize the problem. Do you know the total draw on the circuit?
Dave

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