gfi outlets in galley kitchen

I am getting to the end of a kitchen reno. This is a galley style kitchen. On one side of the kitchen is the sink, where I will put GFI outlets. On the opposite wall there is just cabinets with counterspace. Am I correct that no GFI outlets are required on the opposite wall since there is no sink? Is there a distance requirement where GFI should be located from the sink and does that apply to the same counter, or overall distance from the sink no matter where you are standing?
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On 6/12/2011 10:05 PM, Mikepier wrote:

** All kitchen counter top , island, and peninsula outlets require GFCI protection
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On 6/12/2011 9:40 PM, RBM wrote:

The electricians who did my kitchen said that only outlets within a certain distance from a water source (either two or three feet, IIRC) had to be GFI. The remaining countertop and island outlets were standard. The instpector passed it.
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They were all wrong. ALL counter tops in the kitchen require GFCI and have for the last 5 cycles (since 1996)
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There is a distance factor, but I'm not positive. I think 6' from the sink edge. Best to check with the local inspector in case he interprets things differently
You use plural outlets. Only one on a branch has to be gfci, the ones downstream will be protected. Of course, you want a few circuits in the kitchen so as not to overload when running a toaster and coffee pot, etc.
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On Sun, 12 Jun 2011 23:16:04 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

But not the refrigerator or freezer, I learned here. No gfci there. (too likely to trip and ruin the food, and I guess no one shocks himself from the fridge.)
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On 6/13/2011 3:11 AM, mm wrote:

The NEC does not agree.
Circuits for plug-in refrigeration in commercial kitchens have to be GFCI protected. The reason is shocks (based on experience).
For residential, the NEC used to have some exceptions from GFCI protection where a refrigerator was plugged in. The exceptions are all gone.
--
bud--


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On 6/12/2011 11:16 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

** When GFCI protection was first required for kitchen counter outlets, it was for outlets within six feet of the sink. It's since evolved into requiring all counter outlets to be protected
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OK, good to know thanks.
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one day it will be every outlet in home
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On 6/13/2011 5:50 PM, bob haller wrote:

No, current code requires AFCI protection for most other outlets in habitable rooms
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..
Can those arc fault devices be daisy-chained like GFCI's can be daisy- chained?
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wrote:

m...
The AFCI's in my house are really circuit breakers. Somewhat $$ compared to standard breakers.
Joe
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There is a mythical "device" style AFCI but like unicorns, big foot and an honest politician, nobody has really seen one. Breakers are what you get. The code still would only allow you to have this device connected to the panel with metal conduit or "steel armored" MC/AC cable.
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On 6/13/2011 11:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't see why they couldn't

Nice. I did see a picture of an AFCI receptacle (which didn't then exist) in a 2011 code changes book.
Starting 2014, in areas where new circuits have to be AFCI protected, replacement receptacles will have to be AFCI protected. Can be by AFCI breakers or "mythical" AFCI receptacles, or downstream from AFCI receptacles.
Starting in the 2011 NEC, extensions to circuits in areas where AFCI protection for new circuits is required, the extensions have to be AFCI protected. Can be by AFCI breakers or being downstream from a "mythical" AFCI receptacle. (I remembered this one was delayed too, but it isn't.)
You are doubtless aware of these, but others may not be.
Looks like the code panel wants a retro requirement that old circuits be AFCI protected and this is all they could do. Would be nice if they didn't want "mythical devices".
Any rumors on the ultimate intent - like all 15/20A circuits everywhere be AFCI protected?

True when used to protect a new circuit (as the equivalent of an AFCI breaker).
If used as above as a replacement receptacle, or to protect circuit extensions, or to protect existing downstream receptacles they wouldn't need the metal protection. Until maybe the next NEC.
--
bud--




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com...
Are they in the "Breaker Box" or are they part of duplex outlets like gfci's?
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