GFI outlet

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I believe most of my outlets are wired in one series to a GFI outlet in my garage but I'm not sure of the outlet beside my garage door opener. Is there a way to tell if this outlet is also protected?
Also, is there a difference between a GFI outlet and surge protected outlet ? Keep in mind, I'm far from a electrical guru so easy words please <grin>.
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If you want to do it simple, the GFI outlet should have a test button on it. Press that button, it should trip the GFI. You will not have any power at that outlet. Then go to the other outlets and see if you have power there. Plug in a lamp or radio or any small device to check for power. When you have found outlets that do not work, go back to the GFI outlet and press the reset button. That will turn the power back on. Go to the other outlets and power should also be restored there.
Of the garage door opener is in the cealing of the garage, I doubt it is hooked to the GFI as you want to get the door open if that is where the opener is plugged in. Same as you do not hook a GFI to a refrigerator. Those things can trip for no good reason and all the food will go bad.
A GFI outlet or breaker if in the main box are to prortect you. In simple terms it senses a current differance between the hot and neutral wires. All the curent goes out of one hole in the outlet and should come back in the other hole. If for some reason some of the current goes out of one hole, but say there is a short from that wire to the metal case of something you have in your hand (say electric weed eater). Some of the current will go through you and to the earth and not return to the other wire. If enough goes this path, you will get electricuted. The ammount is less than it takes to light up a 10 watt lightbulb. If working correctly, the GFI will open up the circuit before the current will cause you any harm. Also if an outside outlet gets wet, it can trip the GFI if it has one.
A surge protected outlet will not do anything to protect you. They are made to protect electronic devices from over voltage. Say during a thunder storm, lightning hits some electrical wires down the road , a high voltage may be developed and comes into your house. The surge protector is to send this voltage to the ground wire and protect the electronic devices in your house. They are not big enough to protect extreanly large surges if say lightning hits the pole outside your house.
Very shout version. GFI protects you, surge protector protects equipment from over voltage.
There is some more to that above, but this is the simple version that should get the meaning across.
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On Thu, 13 Dec 2012 17:04:36 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Great Ralph, that explains it well. Why didn't I think of the switch to trip the GFI .... guess it shows my electrical knowledge :( Thanks !!
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wrote:

And if those outlets are in a different room, a plug in radio with the volume turned up is an easy way to identify them.
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Doug wrote:

Hi, My opener is not on GFI. Other outlets are on it. I wouldn't put garage door opener or fridge on GFI. If they lose power... think about. it.
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On 2/16/2013 11:29 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Or a sump pump or a alarm system
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1) Push the test button on the GFCI outlet. When the outlet clicks, go plug in something to the "suspect" outlet, see if it's live or dead. If it's dead, it's on the same circuit.
2) surge protected is what computers need. If there is too high voltage, like lightning near by, it trips off. Protects the computer from being fried or burnt up. GFCI means if some power is leaking like someone getting a shock, it trips off. Protects people from being electrocuted.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I believe most of my outlets are wired in one series to a GFI outlet in my garage but I'm not sure of the outlet beside my garage door opener. Is there a way to tell if this outlet is also protected?
Also, is there a difference between a GFI outlet and surge protected outlet ? Keep in mind, I'm far from a electrical guru so easy words please <grin>.
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On Thu, 13 Dec 2012 18:02:32 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Thanks Chris. I think I got it !!!
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Every person has "I didn't know that" moments. Some kind people explain, others criticize. I hope to be remembered as nice.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Thanks Chris. I think I got it !!!
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On a.h.r., where you act like an ass with every post by top-posting? Unlikely.
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Stormin Mormon has brought this to us :

You would be remembered even better if you used a proper usenet browser and bottom posted as nearly everyone else does.
I suppose you drive on the left of the road too, just to be different.
PS. most of your answers are good sense.
--
John G



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wrote:

And get rid of the religious propaganda at the bottom of posts. No one here needs to be saved by you. We all have churches in our towns and cities if we want them.
Hell, I could do the same damn thing, for example lets say....
John O. Doe Find Jesus and His Momma Mary St Pauls Catholic Church www.stpaulscatholicchurch.org
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If it was me, I'd plug something into the suspect outlet before I tripped the GFCI to ensure that it actually worked at the time.
If the device goes off when I tripped the GFCI I'd know right away and could reset the GFCI without walking back and forth.
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Radio on full volume. "work from here".
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If it was me, I'd plug something into the suspect outlet before I tripped the GFCI to ensure that it actually worked at the time.
If the device goes off when I tripped the GFCI I'd know right away and could reset the GFCI without walking back and forth.
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Here's some easy words: All that crap is just a con job. Some dickwad invented the stuff, then bought some lawmakers. You flat out don't need any of that crap. You don't even need the damn ground pin anymore, since everything is plastic and double insulated.
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You are the dickwad. The previous answers have been absolutely on the mark and you should be ashamed for your bad language and een worse comments themselves.
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wrote:

Maybe one day he'll pick up a damaged extension cord on one of those outlets without a GFCI and get his just reward.
Perhaps he has some statistics to back up his claim?
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In article

I looked up those statistics for y'all a few years ago. More people die by falling down on level ground than are electrocuted in their homes.
And almost all of the people who *are* electrocuted in their homes, die while working on 240 volt wiring. Note the "240 volts" and the fact they're actively doing wiring repairs when electrocuted.
It is almost impossible to electrocute yourself accidentally with 120 volts. Mythbusters couldn't even kill a crash test dummy by throwing a hair dryer or radio into the bathtub.
You can be damn sure that nobody lusted after a GFI until some shyster invented the gadget and hyped the shit out of the horrible imaginary dangers of electricity.
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If you think there is a big difference in the electrocution risk of 240V, versus 120V, maybe you can offer some insight into how that is so?
To electrocute yourself with 240V, while working on say an oven or water heater, you'd have to put yourself across both hots at the same time. Now in my world, that seems extremely unlikely. Far more likely you're touching the grounded water tank or oven and touch ONE of the hots. Or standing on a damp concrete floor and contacting one hot.
So, please explain how folks typically manage to come across both hots to receive 240V......
Mythbusters couldn't even kill a crash test dummy by throwing a

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The british regulations do not consider anything over 50V DC to be "safe" - even then, Extra Low Voltage wiring in bathrooms (even at 12V) has to be seperated from ground as an extra precation.
We have 100-120V [1] in the same band as 220-240V and both systems have to meet the same wiring standards.
[1] Not common but 110V tools exist for building site usage - albeit wired as 55-ground-55 which does increase the safety another notch.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent
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