GFI Outlet

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Wayne Whitney wrote:

ok, keep putting them on there and keep resetting them. yor choice.
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

Hi, In real life leakage current is not the only thing trips GFCI. Ever measured surge when a motor starts? GFCI being electronic sensor that surge can trigger it too. I am talking from real life experience.
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On Thu, 10 Sep 2009 11:24:18 -0500, Steve Barker

How do you reconcile that with the code that requires them a lot of places where motors are used? (Kitchen counters, garages, basements, outdoors, bathrooms and within 5' of the laundry sink).
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You probably have a defective GFCI, but it is entirely possible to have a ground fault in one of the appliances. If your machines are located in an unfinished basement, a garage, or within six feet of a slop sink, GFCI protection is required by current code, NO EXCEPTIONS
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Any place you could possibly touch a faulty electrical device and a good ground at the same time. Therefore, within reach of a sink or shower or a damp concrete floor.
That makes sense - but what of safety grounds? They are there for the same purpose. Fridges have 3 wire cords. Unlike many "double insulated" or "polarized" small appliances. And things like hair driers. If the ONLY thing that can be plugged into a circuit provided for the fridge is the fridge, I really can't see why they would REQUIRE a GFCI.
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Agree, or disagree, GFCI protection is required by location, not by application, and as long as a refrigerator uses a standard plug, anything that uses a standard plug will go in the same outlet
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desgnr wrote:

Yes, but I'd check the wiring connections first. Spikes generated by washer and dryer motors shouldn't normally trip GFIs since they're allowed to delay tripping to handle nuisances, by as much as ~7 seconds for ~4mA detected leakage. UL standard 943 explains it, for the low, low price of just $750.
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wrote:

    You don't use a GFI for that application, You make sure you have it properly grounded.
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