GFI down stream from a GFI


Anyone know if installing a GFI on the load side of another GFI can cause problems.
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Why would anyone want to? If the first GFCI is wired so that it protects the entire downstream circuit, the second one is unnecessary -- and if it's not wired that way, then the two won't interfere with each other.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 15:46:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

This usually happens when a GFCI protected appliance (pressure washer, boat lift etc) gets plugged into a GFCI protected outlet. It will work fine.
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I believe that GFCI is good for protecting only 6(?) outlets beyond itself. Can't imagine more outlets that that on one circuit, but that's the NEC (if memory serves).
Enjoy,
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DaveC
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Got a citation for that? I can't find anything like that in the Code.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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