GFCI wiring procedure

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wrote:

going to the GFCI and a black wire going to the downstream outlets. Same for the white wires. I don't see another interpretation that would have let the old GFCI work.
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One would _hope_ that's the case... but that's clearly *not* what the OP wrote.

Neither do I -- but I also don't see any indication anywhere that it _did_ work. My guess is that it doesn't, and that's why he's replacing it -- because he doesn't know it's wired wrong, and thinks it's defective.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Tue, 09 Jan 2007 14:17:06 -0600, "dclutch"

IMHO:
1. Only qualifed electricians should work with electricity.
2. Follow the manufactures directions.
3. Verifty you have the pigtailed leads hooked up to the proper terminals. If you are only looking to protect this receptacle, then the terminals should be "Line".
4. Ensure you wired correctly. "hot" to brass/gold screw, and "neutral" to silver screw. Equipment "Grounding" wire to green screw.
5. Make sure the wire connections are tight. I.E. check under wire nuts, wires secure in terminals, etc.
hth,
tom @ www.MedJobSite.com
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dclutch wrote:

The only thing I can think of is that you may have somehow misidentified the load and line terminals on that GFCI and are feeding the power into the load terminals instead of the line terminals.
As others have already said, if PROPERLY wired as you intended, the GFCI won't give a rat's ass about what else may be connected to its line side.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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On Tue, 09 Jan 2007 14:17:06 -0600, "dclutch"

You shouldn't need to pigtail the GFCI. All of the new ones I have seen have 2 wire holes per termination so you can connect the in and out to one terminal. As the other posters have said, ber sure you have ot polarized right (white and black) and you are connected to the line side.
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On Tue, 09 Jan 2007 14:17:06 -0600, "dclutch"

Hire a professional electrician. You are not qualified to do this repair and if you do, your home will burn to the ground and kill everyone in your home. Shut off all power in your home immediately and call an electrician. This is not a joke. Run to your breaker panel IMMEDIATELY and disconnect the main breaker NOW. As soon as you do, call the Fire Department and tell them there is a fire inside this outlet box (because there is).
Department of Electrical Safety
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On Tue, 09 Jan 2007 14:17:06 -0600, "dclutch"

That shouldn't happen if you connect it properly. Connect everything to the LINE terminals on the GFCI and nothing to the LOAD terminals.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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