GFCI wall outlet in unfinished basement

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Washers contain an AC motor; any possibility of the GFI outlet 'tripping'. (Due to momentary unbalance currents). Thinking of the same reason that GFIs not recommended for fridges etc. that also contain motor!
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They (both GFCIs and 'fridges) are *supposed* to be better about nuisance tripping. In any case, if the washing machine nuisance trips it's not as much of a danger as if it doesn't when needed. Whatever you think about 'fridges and GFCIs, washers should *always* have them. Water, ya know.
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wrote:

They (both GFCIs and 'fridges) are *supposed* to be better about nuisance tripping. In any case, if the washing machine nuisance trips it's not as much of a danger as if it doesn't when needed. Whatever you think about 'fridges and GFCIs, washers should *always* have them. Water, ya know.
There is actually no NEC requirement for "washers" to have GFCI protection. GFCI protection is governed by the location of the outlet, and or appliance manufacturer requirements
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I thought any outlet near (within 6'?) service had to be GFCI protected.
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wrote:

Any outlet within 6 feet of a sink needs to be GFCI protected. You don't necessarily have a sink within 6 feet of a washer
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Ah, I thought the water pipe was considered a "sink". It'll certainly sink electrons, like one. ;-)
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wrote:

I think that the primary concern with sinks, is small appliances falling into them. Not likely your washer is going to fall in. In kitchens, the original GFCI requirement was within six feet of the sink, the code also restricted the length of kitchen appliance cords, so the idea was that an appliance with a short cord couldn't reach the sink except if plugged into a GFCI outlet. As far as the washer is concerned, if the outlet is properly grounded and the washer has a grounding cord on it, you're safe.
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Seems as though one local inspector I'm aware of will still want a GFCI since it is water and an electric appliance. If you are pulling a permit it would be smart to ask in advance.
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wrote

And depending upon the location of the washer you're making reference to, it may very well require a GFCI protected outlet by NEC rules as well
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terry wrote:

Refrigeration that plugs into 15/20A 120V receptacles in commercial kitchens has to be on GFCI protected circuits. The problem is leakage, not imbalance. As John said, these days appliances in good repair should not trip GFCIs.
--
bud--

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Yes.
Yes. I have seen instances where the NM cable was strapped directly to the unfinished basement wall. If you keep the receptacle up high enough so that it is above the machine and not behind, there should be no physical damage issue.
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Beta-42 wote:

John Grabowski wrote:

Thanks. I'm still going to use the PVC conduit that I planned on using for this one project. But, now I know that in some other cases in an unfinished basement I can just staple the NM cable to a running board that goes down to a wall outlet or switch if the setup is such that there is no reason to believe the NM cable needs to be protected from physical damage. I had thought that was no longer permitted, but I guess it can be okay in some circumstances.
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Beta-42 wrote:

Before you do all that, consider that the motor surge of the washing machine may nusiance-trip the GFCI outlet (same as a refrigerator).
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Agreed that's possible. I don't believe that a gfci would be required in this situation. But if you are worried I suspect a single plug outlet dedicated to the washer would avoid any code entanglements without using a gfci. But I have seen many ordinary 2 plug outlet boxes in infinshed basements without gfci's in them.
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wrote:

Agreed that's possible. I don't believe that a gfci would be required in this situation. But if you are worried I suspect a single plug outlet dedicated to the washer would avoid any code entanglements without using a gfci. But I have seen many ordinary 2 plug outlet boxes in infinshed basements without gfci's in them.
The gfci will not be affected by a motor surge, and gfci protection is required for ALL 15 & 20 amp outlets in unfinished parts of a basement
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*At my last code update seminar when the new changes to GFI protection requirements came up, the instructor told us that appliance manufacturers were now building appliances to higher leakage standards than before. Nuisance tripping of the garage refrigerator should be eliminated as well as other major appliances. Also GFI's have been redesigned in the past few years and you should not have the problems that were a nuisance in the past.
From my own experience I have received calls from customers complaining of nuisance tripping with appliances. The problem usually turned out to be with the appliance.
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Be that as it may. If you have a major appliance that if fine other than nuisance tripping the gfci you gonna buy a new appliance? Or take out the gfci and replace it with a single outlet?
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wrote:

Be that as it may. If you have a major appliance that if fine other than nuisance tripping the gfci you gonna buy a new appliance? Or take out the gfci and replace it with a single outlet?
People can, and will do whatever they want, however the current NEC does not have a provision or exception for using anything but a GFCI protected outlet in an unfinished basement
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Be that as it may. If you have a major appliance that if fine other than nuisance tripping the gfci you gonna buy a new appliance? Or take out the gfci and replace it with a single outlet?
*First I would replace the GFI with a new GFI. If the tripping was not eliminated, that would indicate that there's a problem with the appliance and a possible shock hazard. I would not want to keep an appliance that I could get electrocuted from.
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