GFCI outlets vs. GFCI breakers?

We are about to move into a house that has regular (non-GFCI) outlets in kitchen, bathrooms, garage and on the patio.
Is it better to replace the outlets by GFCI ones or to replace the breakers by GFCI ones (assuming that GFCI ones are available for that particular panel -- brand unknown so far)?
-=- Alan
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net said...

GFCI breakers tend to be pretty expensive. If you can figure out which outlet is the first one on each chain, just put a GFCI outlet there and it will protect all of the downstream outlets.
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said...

Also they are supposed to be tested monthly. They are electronic and can fail. I would bet almost no one tests the ones in the panel. Use the GFCI outlets, but try to put them where you will see them often -- then you will remember to test them at least once in a while. even if that means installing extras, they are only about 8 bucks each.
Be sure that you use 20 amp GFCIs on 20 amp circuits, such as the kitchen.
Do not put refrigerators, freezers, etc on GFCIs -- they can nuisance trip.
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Methinks for kitchens etc., a 15 amp GFI with a 20 amp feed through is acceptable rather than 20 amp GFI's.
Stan

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Unless you just can't live with the looks of a GFCI outlet, avoid the breakers. They are a real pain to reset or troubleshoot. Not to mention, more expensive.
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Humbug. While the outlets are cheaper than the breakers, it depends on how the house is wired as to what would be best. I have just one protected breaker which serves all of the outlets required to have such protection in my house. If you have several circuits that need protection, then a protected outlet (first in line) would likely be cheapest.
My protected breaker has tripped several times. There has been no trouble shooting (when something on the line won't turn on the obviously first thought should be that the circuit breaker did it job). Reset is just a matter of walking over to the panel in the garage and flipping it all the way off then on. And yes, I test it occasionally by pushing the red button. BTW, it is now 27 years old.
Wade Lippman wrote:

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Everyone's entitled to an opinion; however odd.
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Hi, Speaking of an outlet, I use one with indicator light. When it is on, there is tiny green LED on, when tripped, the LED is off. Very handy. In my house some outlets, and breakers for Jacuzzi pump and kitchen on a sub panel inside broom closet on main floor.(don't have to go down stairs to reset when tripped) Tony
Wade Lippman wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net said...

You have one breaker for your kitchen, all of your bathrooms and your outside outlets?
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Brad wrote:

Yeah. Seems kind of skimpy doesn't it? Actually the circuit just protects 3 outlets, one in each bathroom and one outside plus two outside lights. Kitchen plugs aren't protected.
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He said that the breaker was 27 years old, so, it's not controlling any kitchen outlets [US code] ;-)
These days, it's not possible to run all of the protection-required outlets off one breaker. US kitchen rules imply 2 seperate breakers as a bare _minimum_ just for counters.
Canadian rules are worse in this regard. If it required GFI on kitchen counter outlets, this means a minimum of two two-pole GFI breakers.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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