GFCI must be 20 amps.

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On Mon, 8 Feb 2010 08:18:53 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

If there was a sink right outside the door of that room it would still be considered a bathroom because the code says "area". It is not uncommon in McMansions to have a sink and vanity outside the room where the toilet and shower is. (similar to what you see in a hotel) The whole area is the bathroom.
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On Feb 8, 12:03 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Trust me, this house is a far cry from a McMansion!
The only sink in the "area" was a utility sink on the opposite side of the basement. You'd have to consider the whole basement as the bathroom for the NEC to consider that room a bathroom.
Now, while I was replacing the toilet and shower I did remove the bathroom walls, so for a short period of time that whole section of the basement was one room, which included the utility sink, so I guess it was a bathroom per the NEC while the walls were down.
I wonder if they care that the "bathroom" had a fridge, furnace, washer, dryer, storage shelves, TV, ironing board, etc. etc. etc. in it. ;-)
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On Mon, 8 Feb 2010 11:17:44 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

That is not really an issue then since the only required receptacle in a bathroom is the one near the basin and now all receptacles close to a sink of any kind has to be GFCI. You are not required to make this 20a since this is not a bathroom. If the sink was right outside the water closet door it might be called a bathroom. .
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That is not a proper bathroom either...
Plumbing code requires wherever a toilet is installed a sink is also required...

~~ Evan
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re: "That is not a proper bathroom either"
Tell that to my town...
Once again it shows that local assessment codes have nothing to do with NEC/plumbing/other codes.
As per my town, any 2 fixtures is a 1/2 bath, even if by plumbing code it's not a "proper bath".
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Doug Miller wrote:

of 7 sq. ft. There is no place to plug in a radiator. The only place to put the outlet is in the same electrical box as the light switch. The light is already wired with 14/2 and the ceiling is closed.
I can break the code in one of three ways: 1. Put two circuits in one electrical box (15amp and 20amp) 2. Have only one 20 amp circuit with 14/2 wire running to the light 3. Use a 15amp GFCI outlet.
I'm thinking of going for #3.
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Meets the NEC definition of a bathroom.

Huh? Radiator?

Oh, come on, now. Surely there's some place where you can add a new outlet on a separate 20A circuit. Use your imagination.

That's not a violation as far as I am aware.

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On Mon, 08 Feb 2010 18:57:25 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
[snip]

An electric heater that looks like a radiator? These are often expensive and claim to put out more heat than they possibly can.
[snip]
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wrote:

At a certain point I might agree with you and "come and get me copper" but if this is going to be inspected your AHJ will probably want to see the 20a circuit (with 12 ga wire).
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re: "There is a toilet and a sink in an area of 7 sq. ft. "
Wow!
I've got a tiny sink in my basement bathroom - 15" x 12", which 1.25 sq ft.
My toilet is 31" x 18" which is 3.875 sq ft.
That means you have 7 - (3.875 + 1.25) = 1.875 sq ft of "open space" left.
Do you have to pull your pants up in the hallway?
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Mikepier wrote the following:

The OP (me) has a 20 amp GFCI breaker for the garage circuit in the breaker box. The overload tripping the GFCI breaker is so infrequent that it is hard to pin down what happened to cause the breaker to trip. Maybe the refrigerator and freezer happen to be running at the same time that I use the garage door opener, but if it did, I would know immediately since I wouldn't be able to close the door. . Nothing else in the garage is running all the time nor is anything plugged in that automatically starts and stops, other than the refrigerator and the freezer. Absent that knowledge, I would just like to be able to reset the circuit without having to make a trip to the basement to reset the breaker . I already have a solution to warn me when the breaker has tripped. The garage door wired opener with the red light being moved to inside the abode, as mentioned in an earlier thread. I think I may buy a power strip for each of the three outlets in the garage, and when the circuit is overloaded, the tripped breaker in that power strip will let me know where the problem is.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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That approach of finding the overload will work IF it happens that a major short or overload of some kind is happening at whatever happens to be plugged into the one particular strip that may trip. But it's not going to tell you if the sum total of ALL the loads everywhere on the circuit is just exceeding 20 amps. To do that with your approach, you'd have to have a 20 amp power strip and plug ALL the loads into the one strip.
As I suggested previously, I'd start by getting a Kill-a-Watt or an amp meter and measuring what each of the various loads on that circuit is pulling to determine if any one is out of range. Also, again, if it's the STARTING current from the fridge that's tripping it, changing the breaker to a delay type may solve the problem. And if it's one appliance, like a freezer that is pulling way too much, the solution may be to replace it with a new one which could use $100 or more a year LESS electricity and pay for itself.
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"Sam Takoy" wrote in message

Yes a 20 amp outlet GFCI or regular would need to be on a 20 amp circuit. This would be an outlet with an additional slot for a sideways prong.
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