GFCI must be 20 amps.

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Hi,
My contractor told me that by code a 20amp GFCI outlet must be on a 20amp circuit. True or false?
Thanks,
Sam
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Look here:
TinyURL -
http://tinyurl.com/yjgo652
Full URL -
http://www.nachi.org/forum/attachments/f19/18525d1202766810-20-amp-outlet-15-amp-circuit-receptacle-rating-table.jpg
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True. The National Electrical Code permits putting 15A outlets on 20A circuits, but not the other way around.
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On Feb 3, 9:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I'm assuming it's OK to put the circuit in question on a 15A GFCI breaker. That would solve the problem.
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wrote:

I'm assuming it's OK to put the circuit in question on a 15A GFCI breaker. That would solve the problem.
He still can't put a 20 amp receptacle on it.
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No, but I think the OP's problem is he wants a certain outlet which is on a 15A circuit to be GFI protected. If he did not want to re-run the whole circuit to be 20A, he could just simply install a 15A GFI breaker.
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wrote:

No, but I think the OP's problem is he wants a certain outlet which is on a 15A circuit to be GFI protected. If he did not want to re-run the whole circuit to be 20A, he could just simply install a 15A GFI breaker.
You may be correct, but sometimes people want to use 20 amp devices because their built "stronger". There is no reason that the OP can't install a 15 amp GFCI outlet on the circuit.
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That is not really true if you compare apples to apples. Most 20a receptac;es are "spec grade". You can't really compare that to the 49 cent economy grade 15a receptacle but if you buy a 15a spec grade it will be as well built as the 20a, for about the same price.
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OK, it turns out that I misunderstood what my contractor was telling me.
According to him, in a new work bathroom, all circuits must be 20amp and GFCI. So I'm not allowed to run a 15 amp circuit there. True or false?
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"Sam Takoy" wrote in message

True. And it needs to be a separate 20 amp circuit for just the bathroom.
That is so you can use a hair blow dryer and not trip the breaker...
If you have other power hogs in there like an electric heater, might want additional circuits. The idea is you can use the things in your bathroom without breakers tripping. Makes life more enjoyable! You use your bathroom everyday...
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False.
2008 NEC, Article 210.11(C)(3) requires a minimum of one 20A circuit to supply bathroom receptacles -- but it does not prohibit installation of 15A circuits in addition to the required 20A circuit.

Not quite correct.
That one 20A circuit is permitted to supply receptacles in *multiple* bathrooms. It may not supply receptacles anywhere else, but it it *not* required to have one 20A circuit *per bathroom*.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Do the same rules apply to first floor powder rooms?
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I have no idea what you mean by a "powder room".
Here's what the NEC means by "bathroom": "An area including a basin with one or more of the following: a toilet, a tub, or a shower." [2008 NEC, Article 100]
NEC rules applying to bathrooms apply to any room meeting that definition, regardless of what you call it, or what floor it's on.
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On Feb 8, 7:17 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

This is just an interesting story about the differences between local tax codes and NEC Codes - which I know are in no way related.
re: " Here's what the NEC means by "bathroom": "An area including a basin with one or more of the following: a toilet, a tub, or a shower." [2008 NEC, Article 100] "
When I moved into my house, it was listed as having 1.5 baths and I was taxed as having 1.5 baths. The 1/2 bath in the basement had a toilet and a shower but no sink.
My town's tax code considers any room with 2 fixtures to be a half- bath, more than 2 to be a full bath - regardless of what the fixtures are.
So, per the NEC, I guess that room wasn't a bathroom but per my town it was.
re: "I have no idea what you mean by a "powder room"."
I don't know if you were being serious or not, so...
In many parts of our fair country, that first floor room with the sink and toilet is often referred to as a "powder room" as in the room you go to right after you say "Excuse me, I'm going to powder my nose."
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a completely separate question from whether it's a bathroom for the purposes of your property tax assessment.

Of course I was being serious. I know what *I* mean by that phrase, but the only thing that's relevant here is what *he* means by it. And since he didn't explain that, there's no way to know. We can guess, but we can't know.

And that, of course, is a bathroom as defined by the NEC. But that still doesn't tell us what the OP meant by that phrase.
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On Feb 8, 11:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Doug,
I didn't mean anything by my comment. I don't know if every locale uses the same terminology for that type of room.
Where I grew up we ate heros and drank soda. Where I live now, it's subs and pop.
I was just trying to help.

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No offense taken; I'm sorry I gave the impression there was.
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On Feb 8, 11:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

What *else* would he mean?
Does he need to explain "kitchen" or "bedroom" to you as well?
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

OP means by that term is necessary in order to answer his question about what parts of the NEC might apply to it.
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On Feb 8, 2:31 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

He could have meant this...
http://www.powderrm.com /
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