GFCI : Kitchen crackling sound with light smoke

When we use a Microwave oven and toster together in Kitchen, one of the GFCI receptacles in Kitchen generates a crackling sound, with light smoke. I have discontinued usage of microwave in Kitchen and since then have had no issues.
Please let me know: 1. Cause for the above issue 2. Remedy to resolve the issue.
Thanks.
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Could be a loose connection on the GFI. Take it apart and replace it.
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AT wrote:

possible. The one you are using now seems to be protected by, or shorting to, the GFCI.
That's easy enough to change, as GFCIs have a separate connection for unprotected circuits but, given your question, that fix could be unsafe for you to handle.
IOW, call an electrician or a more experienced friend.
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A cracklin sound and smoke, and you never thought fire follows. A toaster and microwave I bet are near or over the capacity of the gfi. I would not even have power to that gfi, its a fire hazard.
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ransley wrote:

Shouldn't be. I have a 1200 watt microwave and a toaster on a single GFCI in the kitchen and it works fine. His is probably defective.
--
Claude Hopper :)

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ransley wrote:

And once any smoke came out of it, I would think that the GFI is not the same as it was before, and never will be again.
I consider it necessary to replace the GFI, with one rated for 20 amps.
And if the replacement smokes, I would replace it *again* along with avoiding repeat of condition that caused it to smoke.
Furthermore, I would check that the breaker is not oversized. I might even get into a good mood to replace a breaker that does not trip when both a microwave and a toaster are drawing current through it.
It is furthermore a good idea to have everything on the branch circuit from the breaker on out to have the samp amp rating. Should there be any mismatch anywhere, I would glue a little note in the breaker box by the breaker with notation of whatever is the lowest amp rating of anything in the branch circuit, maybe even with notation of mismatch of sizings within the branch circuit.
Heck, it appears to me to be a code violation to have a branch circuit having different sizes of "Romex". And if the wiring is oversized to prevent excessive voltage drop in a long run, I would glue a note next to the breaker saying in as few words as possible along the lines of "15A circuit with oversized long wire run, max breaker 15A". Probably good to have have everything permanently installed matching each other in amp rating should someone decide years later to "upgrade" the breaker to amp allowance of the circuit's wiring and then tolerate the voltage drop to a "full load" at the end of the "long wire run".
I feel some sense that long wire runs should avoid oversized wire downstream of branch circuit breakers by means of a subpanel, but subpanels add chances for "open neutral" problems.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Just an FYI, the microwave should be on its own circuit, and the toaster ( assuming its plugged into the countertop outlet) is suppose to be seperate as well. If not, I would just remeber not to use both at the same time.
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Thanks to all for suggestions
AT
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