GFCI first in circuit?

I know that in order to protect all the outlets downstream the GFCI outlet needs to be the first outlet in the chain. But I keep reading that the GFCI must be the first outlet after the service panel. I DAGS but I can't find anything that says it's mandatory. So why can't I put the GFCI as the second outlet for protection there and the 3rd outlet. I know I wouldn't have the protection in the first on but that is going to be a major hassle to replace because I would have to rip out the box because it is too shallow. Besides that outlet is inside the house and the two I want to protect are outside. I know that it's probably not up to code that way. But that is how it's been wired for at least 15 years. Bob
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The Other Funk wrote:

I've got a couple I wired that way when I replaced unprotected outside recepticals with GFCIs in good weatherproof boxes. I'd chopped into enough extension cords with my old aluminum bodied B&D hedge trimmer over the years that I figgered my luck couldn't hold out forever and I'd better put those GFCIs in. <G>
I can't think of any electrical reason why those aren't "safe", as the outlets upstream of them are in locations which wouldn't require GFCI recepticals, but YMMV with your local inspector.
HTH,
Jeff
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you can buy an extension ring in the wiremold section of the electrical dept to help with making a small electrical box bigger by extending it into the room a bit. "the code" is to protect your life but varies depending on your address. maybe replace the breaker with a gfi breaker. maybe just add a gfi outlet for indoor or outdoor circuits. EVEN IF THERE IS NO GROUND WIRE it offers extra protection. see also gfi electrical faq at: http://www.landfield.com/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 / see even more thorough details with pictures at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_fault_circuit_interrupter
The Other Funk wrote:

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Its perfectly fine to protect just part of a branch curcuit with GFCI so long as the unportected receptacles aren't required to be GFCI for an independent reason (outdoor, kitchen, bath, etc). You don't need to label the unportected receptacle as being so but you should label the downstream ones as connected to GFCI using the provided stickers if for no other reason than to remind you to look for the reset button before going to the breaker box.
You could also replace the breakers in your box with GFCI but they cost a bit more than a receptacle.
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On Fri, 07 Jul 2006 17:57:03 GMT, "The Other Funk"

Just the first one you want/need to protect. It can really go anywhere as long as you don't need upstream protection.
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You can also feel free to install GFCI outlets at each location you want or need protected

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