GFCI Failures + Gadgets

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wrote:

Why not just have one huge GFI for the entire electric grid. Then just hire a guy to sit there all day and reset it every 10 seconds. But, hey, look at the bright side of this. You would not need a flasher on your christmas lights...... :)
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wrote:

In actuality, they are often set up to protect only recptacle circuits.
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Gary Tait wrote:

What does the word "they" refer to - a "whole house GFCI" ??
In actuality, there is no such thing that could be set up to protect only receptacle circuits. You can protect 1 branch circuit at a time with a GFI breaker or a GFCI receptacle. With a GFCI receptacle, you can also protect only a part of the circuit. A GFCI receptacle can be installed such that it protects all outlets wired downstream of it, or only itself. There's no such thing as a "whole house GFCI" in any event.
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 07:27:25 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net wrote:

Have you seen a European DIN panel setup? With the way they can be configured you can have certain groups of circuits protected, others not.
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"Gary Tait" wrote ...

What would be the reason for NOT protecting all ALL circuits? (Individually, I mean. A single GFCI on the main seems silly.)
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 08:19:28 -0800, "Richard Crowley"

Safety, in that some circuits, that ordinarily would not pose an electrical shock hazard to people, or would be catastrophic if they were to be accidentalle de-powered, such as lighting, heating/coolling, food refrigeration, and fixed appliances in general.
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Cost.
Some loads will trip a GFCI inadvertantly.
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Gary Tait wrote:

No.
Ok, so if I understand it, "whole house" really isn't whole house - its all the receptacle circuits in the house, in the context you use.
Does this "whole house" GFI trip at 5 mA fault current? For the record, I'm talking about ground fault protection for people. If the "whole house" protection trips at a level that could be harmful to people, then it is not the "best thing", as we are discussing in this part of the thread, which started with: "It would be incpnvenient to wait for the Poco to reset it. The best thing would be a whole house GFCI, as is oftern used in most of the rest of the world." from Gary Tait's post.
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We use linear circuits here in the USA. In many countries with 240v "mains", the circuits are "ring."
From a 40a breaker (1 pole) they'd run a #12 (good for 20a) out to the 1st receptacle, then to the 2nd, until the last receptacle on that "ring" is reached, then, continue on back to the SAME breaker.
The neutral does the same thing. All this without ever splicing or cutting the "ring main" conductor.
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