GFCI circuit breaker or individual outlets in basement?

I need to install a circuit of 12 outlets/light fixture in the basement. I understand each GFCI can control 3 downstream outlets (a total of 4). So use of 3 GFCIs should work for the circuit.
Are the any advantages using GFCI circuit breakers? Cost difference is neglegible.
YJ
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snipped-for-privacy@wam.umd.edu (Yi Jin) wrote:

Having a single place to go to reset it if/when it trips?
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GFCI receptacles can be connected so as to protect the entire circuit "downstream" of the device. This also leaves a single place to go to reset it.
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Last time I checked GFCI breakers were ~$30.00 and a GFCI outlet was ~$7.00.
Why are you installing GCFI's in the basement? If it floods electricity in any form would be hazardous. The NEC only requires GCFI's near water, the kitchen, baths and recpts with in 8 feet of ground level, and pools.
Loading of the outlets is up to you. You could put all of the outlets on 1 circuit if you wanted, depending on your loading.
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Chicken soup....."it can't hurt" :-)

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>> I need to install a circuit of 12 outlets/light fixture in the basement. >> I understand each GFCI can control 3 downstream outlets (a total of 4). >> So use of 3 GFCIs should work for the circuit. >> >> Are the any advantages using GFCI circuit breakers? Cost difference is >> neglegible. >> >> YJ > > >Last time I checked GFCI breakers were ~$30.00 and a GFCI outlet was >~$7.00. > >Why are you installing GCFI's in the basement? If it floods electricity in >any form would be hazardous. The NEC only requires GCFI's near water, the >kitchen, baths and recpts with in 8 feet of ground level, and pools. > >Loading of the outlets is up to you. You could put all of the outlets on 1 >circuit if you wanted, depending on your loading. > >
Isn't that a code requirement that basement outlets have to be GFCI?
A circuit of 12 outlets require at least 3 GFCI repts. So there wasn't much cost difference.
As John said, a single breaker for the circuit is easier to reset then finding the right receptcle in the circuit to reset. I probably will use that.
YJ
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Only unfinished basement space needs GFCI protection.

much
You can use one GFI outlet to protect all downstream from it.

finding
If this is finished space you don't need the protection at all. You mentioned putting lites on this circuit as well. I assume you won't be powering your lites via GFI protected circuit?

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>> Isn't that a code requirement that basement outlets have to be GFCI? > > Only unfinished basement space needs GFCI protection.
OK. I didn't know that. Thanks for the information.
>> >> A circuit of 12 outlets require at least 3 GFCI repts. So there wasn't >much >> cost difference. > > You can use one GFI outlet to protect all downstream from it.
From Home Depot Wiring 1-2-3, p.27: "A single GFCI can protect up to four receptacles, switches and lights on the same circuit. ... "
Maybe the GFCI outlet is the most effective, and decreasing in effectiveness down the line. By No. 5 on, GFCI is not so effective to protect?
> If this is finished space you don't need the protection at all. You >mentioned putting lites on this circuit as well. I assume you won't be >powering your lites via GFI protected circuit?
Yes, it will be finished basements. But floor will be ceremic tiles. So it will be wet after being mopped. So maybe GFCI is a good idea there, even though it is not code required?
YJ
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the
effectiveness
Not sure where they got this one, it's news to me.

it will

though it is

You certainly could GFI the outlets in your finished basement space, if that's what you'd like to do. Code doesn't require you to do so, but go ahead and GFI if you want.

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From a Home Depot book, the folks that sell the GFCI units? Of course they will say there is a limit on them, cause they will sell more that way.
A GFCI unit is rated for either 15 or 20 amps, on the downstream load line (check the unit), and you can put as many outlets on a circuit.
In my basement shop area, being unfinished I use GFCI, one per circuit, which then drives several quad outlet boxes, probably a dozen outlets per circuit.
No problems, or false trips.
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Who told you only 3 downstream outlets on a GFCI? There is no limit. And you don't want to GFCI permanent light fixtures.

The use of a standard circuit breaker and a GFCI outlet is cheaper than using a GFCI circuit breaker, and using 2 seperate devices with sererate functions makes future disgnosis of a problem a lot easier.
In addition, if this is a "finished" basement, GFCI protection is not required by code.
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Are you sure? The Home Depot Wiring book says that one GFCI can control upto receptacles.
YJ
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^3 I assume.
If that's what it says, the HD book is wrong.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
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>> >Who told you only 3 downstream outlets on a GFCI? >> >There is no limit. > >> Are you sure? The Home Depot Wiring book says that one GFCI can control >> upto receptacles. > ^3 I assume. > >If that's what it says, the HD book is wrong. >-- >Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est >It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
I meant 1 GFCI control upto 4 outlets. Sorry.
Maybe that was not a code requirement. But I found at least one additional comments from http://www.goodier.com/manual/electricalSystems.html :
GFCI receptacles have a built-in element that senses fluctuations in power. Quite simply, the GFCI is a circuit breaker. ... One GFCI breaker can control up to three or four outlets. Generally all the bathroom receptacles are protected by one GFCI outlet. Another protects the garage, basement and exterior receptacles. ...
YJ
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Yi Jin wrote:

They are saying that one GFCI may control up to 3 or 4 outlets *in homes that they build* -- because they spec them that way. The GFCI doesn't care how many downline outlets there are and the electrical code doesn't care.
I have one GFCI in my basement, right by the panel, that covers all the protected outlets in my basement and outdoors. The freezer outlets are not protected. I have one GFCI in the garage that covers all the outlets in the garage (except the garage door opener outlet). I have separate GFCI's with nothing on the LOAD side in my kitchen and bathroom. Especially the bathroom, because I don't want wet people running naked down to the breaker panel to reset the GFCI when it trips.
-Bob
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How about dry people?
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris Lewis wrote:

That's not a problem; hopefully they won't drip on the kitchen floor. ;-)
-Bob
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Ah. I had thought having naked people run through the house was an _advantage_, but I now see your point about wet ones.
;-)
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
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For someone with an email addy ending in .edu you sure are stupid.
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There can be some advantages to having a GFCI circuit breaker: 1. One device can cover a large area. 2. One place to go to reset the area. 3. Simpler installation. Especially if the wall boxes are small (GFCI's take-up more room than standard duplex outlets).
Disadvantages: 1. Cost, at least compared to 1 or 2 GFCI outlets. 2. If the breaker box is a long way from the area, it can be very irritating to have to go there to reset the GFCI breaker, especially if you get a lot of nuisance tripping. BTW, my experience with nuisance tripping is that the worst offenders are fluorescent lights with magnetic ballasts (the most common kind). My theory is that when the switch is put to the off postion, the field collapses in the ballast, sending a pulse down the neutral line which trips the GFCI. 3. Less likely to test the GFCI on a regular basis.
Mike
: I need to install a circuit of 12 outlets/light fixture in the basement. : I understand each GFCI can control 3 downstream outlets (a total of 4). : So use of 3 GFCIs should work for the circuit.
: Are the any advantages using GFCI circuit breakers? Cost difference is : neglegible.
: YJ
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