GFCI and NEC 2002

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We have exterior receptacles installed on front and back of the house. Our city code adopts NEC 2002. We do and waterproof cover on the receptacles but not GFCI protection. Does the weather cover alone satisfies the code, or we need both cover and GFCI? TIA
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Kathy wrote:

Kathy,
Is there a GFCI upstream? Standard electrical outlets can be protected from a GFCI outlet if connected to the "LOAD" connection on the back of the GFCI.
It may be that your outlets are connected to a GFCI breaker. You could buy an inexpensive outlet tester which also has a GFCI checker. All you'd have to do is plug it into the outlet in question and press the button on the tester.
If the outlet in question is connected through a GFCI, the outlet will lose power as the GFCI upstream trips. Now you get to find the GFCI that was tripped.
I used this method to check the standard outlets outside the older house I bought. I found one of them wasn't on a GFCI, so I changed it out for a GFCI outlet. --Mike
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1. The home is a new contruction. 2. There is no GFCI breaker upstream.
The contractor told us when the cover is there GFCI is not required for outdoor outlets. We are trying to find what he said is true.
Thank you.

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The contractor is wrong. A cover is not going to protect you from anything.
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Are you saying that the code requires GFCI even it has cover? We are trying to find what the code says. The contractor has obligation to make it code compliant.

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Kathy -
_firstname pretty much nailed it. Call your building dept to find what the rule is in your area. As _first said, however - it's possible the contractor is right. But HIGHLY doubtful.
If it does turn out he's right, then put a GFI in on your own anyway. They are around $5.
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let me make it real simple.
YOU NEED A GFCI OUTLET THERE.
end of story.
randy
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A GFCI protected circuit is required anywhere water is routinely or has a high probability of being present. This would most certainly include the outdoors. GFCI is required: Bathrooms Kitchens ( a minimum of 2 circuits for counter top ) Pools Basements Garages Crawl-space service receptical Outdoor recepticals Laundry room (including the dedicated washer circuit)
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Very true, I think the wording is any outside receptacles. No mentioning whether they are covered or not.
Now this is scary, if the builder/electrician couldn't read that simple passage and figure the gfci protection was needed, what else did he miss?
I would get a real house inpection while it's all under warrenty. Might cost you a full day price for the person to pull outlets and check breakers, pipping, insulaiton, etc.... but the cost is minimal if something else is seriously wrong. Example, 300-500 buck inpection cheaper than a million dollar lawsuit for electricuting someone.
IMHO,
tom @ www.ChopURL.com
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Greetings,
Don't worry about the million dollars -- your homeowners should cover it.
William

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William Deans wrote:

Doubt it. If outlet does not meet code, coverage is out the window. Tony
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Oh yeah, scarey thing is I think you are right. I'm sure your insurance company can/will have some clause stating that they would never insure an illegally wired residence, and you never mentioned it on your application; so you(the homeowner) or another, committed fraud. Washing them of any legal/policy responsiblity.
Not a problem, I've heard people with no coverage and high lawsuit judgements against only have to give up 10% max of their gross income for life till it's paid off. What's 10% after they take away all your personal property first? :-P
Doomed,
doomed
doomed........
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Matt wrote:

Ditto. Code or not. both are common sense issue. Tony
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Don't ask a bunch of random people here on the newsgroup. Ask your local building department. Find them in the phone book, and give them a call. I have always found that they are super-friendly if you approach them with polite questions. Just because you call and ask, they won't come around and get you in massive trouble.
Also, why are you asking about the NEC 2002? Do you indeed know that this is the electrical code in effect at the relevant time (usually, when the house was built, more accurately, when the building permit was issued, although some remodels can trigger code upgrades)? For example, when we built our house in 1998, our county was still using the 1993 NEC, even though the 1996 NEC was already issued.
Furthermore, some localities (in particular the big ones: NY, Chicago, LA) use their own electrical codes, or modified versions of the NEC. Even in small localities, the NEC can be modified when it is adopted as the local code. Or there is a local rule that certain parts of the NEC are deliberately not enforced. Example: When we built, the rule that exterior 110V outlets have to have covers that are weatherproof when in use was already in the NEC, but the county handed out a photocopy with each building permit, telling people to not bother, because they are deliberately not enforcing that rule (and since they were $15 a piece back then, and ugly to boot, I didn't install them, except where the Christmas lights plug in).
Now, to really answer your question: Exterior outlets have to be GFCI protected per NEC, and that rule has been effect for a heck of a long time (at least mid- or late-80s). So I would bet a few beers that your contractor is "misinformed", to put it very very mildly. But it is theoretically possible that he's right.
Good luck!
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Is he/are you sure there isn't GFCI protection from an upstream outlet? Often, a garage outlet or a circuit breaker is the GFCI device, and then it feeds normal-looking outlets which are indeed GFCI protected.
The code does not require that the actual GFCI device be outside, only that the outdoor outlet be protected by a GFCI.

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Usually grandfather laws apply. If the outlets were installed before GFCI protection was the law, you probably will comply, however replacing the receptacles with GFCI type is relatively inexpensive and gives you a greater degree of safety

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The only code that is relevant is the code when the home was built. Not what may have been just adopted.
No the covers do not meet the requirement of a GFCI.
GFCI's have been required for some time for residences in certain places. I was installing GFCI's for bathrooms, garages and outside recpts, in the 1970's. (code then here)
If you home was built in the 1970's you may already have them installed as a breaker instead of a outlet which is the way it is done now.
Replacing the non GFCI protected outlets is easy and fairly inexpensive. You will need an gfci outlet and new w/p cover. Sorry the way the gfci's are made is different so your going to need an new cover.
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Forget about the code, Kathy.... get the GFI's (assuming they aren't already a downstream GFI device, as Mike mentioned) and weatherproof covers.
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Matt wrote:

Right. Does safety mean anything to you, Kathy? Code or not I'd install GFI for peace of mind. They cost so little nowadays. Tony
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Kathy wrote:

Under the 2002 NEC both an in use cover and GFCI protection are required. An in use cover is rain tight even with a cord plugged into it. The GFCI protection can be provided by a GFCI breaker or a feed through GFCI receptacle located elsewhere as well as by a GFCI receptacle as the outlet in question. -- Tom H
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