GFCI and downstream receptacles

My 1983 house had only one GFCI receptacle, in the garage.
I first bought 3 more GFCIs to install in the backyard and the bathroom, but I found that GFCI in the garage is the first receptacle after a breaker and it is protecting the bath and backyard also (on the same breaker).
So it seems I don't need to install extra GFCI receptacles. Or is there still additional benefits to have GFCIs downstream?
Another concern is that the receptacle looks old is there any benefit to replace it with one that is sold today? It's got no LED status or anything; but the test button and reset works fine.
My other gripe tho is that it is on the front wall of the garage which I'll be putting some cabinets over it soon, I guess I will have to cut a hole incase I need to reset it in the future.
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As electrical codes changed, electricians found clever ways to meet them and save money. In your case, If your shower caused the thing to trip, you have to run down into the garage to reset it. Not very practical. The early models did false trip often. I'd recommend changing all the outlets in the affected areas with new Gucci's. Just be sure to pigtail your wires, so you're not running loads off of the downstream terminals of the receptacles

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That was my point exactly, when the device trips, you want it to be the outlet you're standing in front of and not the one in another room. I do recommend pigtailing the wires under a wire nut rather than depending on the clamp screws of the receptacle, this way, if you have a loose connection on the outlet, it only affects that outlet and nothing downstream

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The instruction sheet that comes with the Leviton GFCI receptical shows downstream loads daisy-chained off the Load connection points on the back. There is also provision for an extra connection off the Line connection point on the device. I believe using the latter is equivalent to what you call pigtailing. I called Leviton tech support and was told that one can do both. I did this when I wanted two bathroom outlets, both GF protected. I did not want all the outlets daisychained off the existing bathroom outlet to be riding off the bathroom GFCI because a trip would be hard to trace. So, I tapped off the Load points for the second bathroom outlet, and off the Line point for reconnecting the existing downstream outlets.
That said, I'm not an electrician, so take this for what it's worth....
Ed

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