Getting the last little bit of liquid out of cans before they hit the recycle bin

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No, it's not a troll. We always have a little puddle of ooze at the bottom of the recycle bin that attracts all sorts of insects. Anyone have a good way of emptying pop-tops cans completely other than shaking them to death upside-down for 60 seconds? My arthritic wrists are beginning to take exception to all that shaking. I used to crush them and the sides would rupture allowing better drainage - but still puddles. Besides, our recycler specifies "no crushing" for some odd reason. The offset hole and curvature of the can make it really hard to get the last few drops out.
-- Bobby G.
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I would rinse the cans with tap water. Three half cans of water rinse would take out 99+% of insect attracing residue.
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The reason is that they're getting the 5 cent deposit per can.
R
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RicodJour wrote the following:

If their State has a deposit law. Not all do. My state does, but New Jersey next door doesn't. When I have a BBQ or party and people bring their own cans or bottles of beverages, I have to sort them before bringing the NY ones in for deposit.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Sort them for what? The cans and bottles sold here in Florida are still marked with the deposit information for the half dozen states that require it.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote the following:

Is one of them NJ?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

No but they do say CA CHV MI REFUND 10 cents MA-NY-OR-ME-VT-HI-CT-DE-IA 5 cents
and I assumed you were redeeming them in NY for the nickel. Are you saying the ones sold in NJ do not say this?
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On Oct 26, 9:53am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Last time I tried to get deposit money for cans I bought in OH, the machine would not accept them.
I no longer bother myself with redeeming cans and bottles. Instead, I donate them to the Girl Scouts, because a neighbor has a collection bin in their front yard. The troop leader thinks I'm generous, but the scouts don't like me because I bring 'em a truckload about once a year...
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RicodJour wrote:

...
The "no crushing" reason is for the other poster's suggestion--so they can wash them out before beginning processing to minimize the crap in the mix.
--
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That is another reason. Scrap dealers that buy the cans want them uncrushed because unscrupulous people put a little sand in each can before it's crushed to boost the weight.
There's a beer and soda place I've passed a couple times recently where I saw several "obviously not employees but there with the allowance of management" taking great pains divying up cans. Only thing I could surmise is that they were taking the cans somewhere else for the deposit money. Double dipping deposits.
R
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???? I haven't seen a soda/beer can made like that since...well forever it seems.
Harry K
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I have never seen a mixed metal can. What brand/item do you know that has that type of can construction?
R
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On 10/26/2010 8:41 AM RicodJour spake thus:

Must be a You Kay thing.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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On 10/26/2010 11:41 AM, RicodJour wrote:

I haven't seen those since the mid 1970s. It wasn't tell they changed to the necked (like a rifle round) cans, that aluminum could be made thin enough to be cheap, but still stiff enough to stick the lid on. (Leastways, that is how the TV show a few years ago explained it.)
--
aem sends...

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Another reason some recylclers don't want crushed cans is because it prevents them from crushing the cans themselves into bales and cubes for easier handling.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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I turn 'em upside down in the sink, with the edge of the opening turned toward the drain. Once they're as drained as they get, I put 'em on a rack next to the sink until they're dry, or until I'm tired of looking at them. Then they go in the bin (in my case, a bin of "cans and bottles to go back to the store so that I can redeem the deposit I paid when I bought them).
It really doesn't take much time to get them dry enough not to slop up the bottom of the bin.
Cindy Hamilton
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I give 'em a quick rinse with tap water and toss them in the bin.
Every couple of months I wash out the recycling bins. I get some junk in the bottom of the bins, but no bugs.
To clean jars and containers, I add an inch or so of hot tap water, close them and shake them, repeat as required. This cleans out peanut butter, mayo, jelly, etc.
A word of caution: the heat and shaking can build up pressure. I was cleaning a sour cream container the other day and used too much water. The lid popped off and sprayed watered down sour cream all over the back of the sink, the faucet, up under the window sill, in the tracks of the sliding window, etc. It was gross!
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On Tue, 26 Oct 2010 09:19:07 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

If you folks are worried about bugs, dust a little boric acid in the bottom, of the bins. If you have bugs, it will bait them and kill them.
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wrote:

recycler
<<I give 'em a quick rinse with tap water and toss them in the bin.
Every couple of months I wash out the recycling bins. I get some junk in the bottom of the bins, but no bugs.>>
Thanks for your input - We rinse, too, but this last month there was a big black shiny waterbug down in the bin's bottom and the month before a centipede. That's got my wife on edge. Therefore I have been assigned to prevent another recycling day surprise and make the bin a "no bug" zone.
We've had a long, long draught and all sort of critters are being attracted to any bit of water they can find. The best solution so far seems to be to ice pick a hole through the top opening and into the side, letting most of the water drain without subjecting my arthritic wrist to the recycler "cha cha" trying to get the last few drops out.
What amazes me is that despite the best shaking I was able to give those cans, they still retained water and once in the bin they leaked enough to put a puddle at the bin's bottom. It's actually not the occasional waterbug that irks me. We've been using fans this summer and that sucks in a fair amount of no-see-ums into the house. They also gravitate to anything moist and when they find it, they start growing into larger pests.
<A word of caution: the heat and shaking can build up pressure. I was cleaning a sour cream container the other day and used too much water. The lid popped off and sprayed watered down sour cream all over the back of the sink, the faucet, up under the window sill, in the tracks of the sliding window, etc. It was gross!>
This week, the ever-thinner plastic my grocer uses for prepared foods cracked and poured feta pasta salad juice down my leg and into my shoe. Last week the same sort of flimsy container popped open and covered my cold cuts in pineapple juice. But the best fun was shaking up a bottle of V-8 on which the cap was not screwed on, just placed on top of. Looked like a scene from CSI.
-- Bobby G.
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On 10/26/2010 2:33 AM Robert Green spake thus:

Here's a quick "handyman's solution" I just thunk up: take a chunk of wood, say a short piece of tubafour, drive a 16d nail through it, creating a (potentially dangerous) spindle. Grab a can and punch it down on the spindle to puncture it, creating a small drain hole. Drain can.
If it doesn't work on the bottom because the bottom is slightly dished, try puncturing the side of the can. Carefully, now: don't want to put a hole in the palm of your hand. [1]
[1] Reminds me of a really stupid accident I had involving just such a spindle. Back in another life I was working as a guitar repairperson. On my workbench I had a spindle which I used to hold pieces of paper, work orders and such.
Well, of course one day I was working on this guy's nice expensive classical guitar, had it on its side on the bench, when it fell over--right onto the goddamn spindle. Put a nice nail-shaped hole in the top, not all the way through, but plainly visible. Ouch. Not the best day of my life ...
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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