Getting old is no fun

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Per Dan Espen:

Tough on the wife, though.
--
Pete Cresswell

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Maybe, maybe not. If a guy dies working in the yard, first of all, he died outside, not in a hospital room hooked up to machines. That alternative could have been much harder on the wife.
--
Dan Espen

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On 2/23/2016 10:16 AM, Dan Espen wrote:

+1
My grandfather "woke up dead". I'm sure grandmother wasn't keen to find herself lying next to a stiff. But, that was *it* -- over and done with.
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On 2/23/2016 8:12 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Found him the next day? Uh, .... oh never mind. Living alone my neighbors the ones who also live alone, we kind of check on each other, sometimes.
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The wife wasn't speaking to the old guy so didn't realize he hadn't come back in untill she went to cuss him out at breakfast and he wasn't there?
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(PeteCresswell) wrote:

It's an unavoidable evil ... but I actually stay pretty active in other ways too . Unfortunately there's more diggin' in my future , but I might just rent that trac-hoe again when it's time to start the bedroom .
--
Snag



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On 2/23/2016 7:12 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Snow is problematic for several reasons: - WET snow (slush) is just too damn heavy! Couple that with the size of most snow shovels and it's backbreaking (and heart-stopping) work! - dry snow (powder) is light -- often too light and blows off the shovel in brisk winds -- but it's still up-and-down, up-and-down... lower back abuse - inevitably, snow is accompanied by an underlayer of ice. This makes keeping your footing difficult. And, means you have to CHOP ICE to complete the job. - it's cold when you're shoveling; you're bundled up so you're PERSPIRING from the exertion while your exposed skin is FREEZING. Easy to overheat. - snow *needs* to be cleared "now"; it's not like you can spread the job out over several days! By contrast, I can dig a ditch for an irrigation line over the course of WEEKS, if I so choose! (when I dug out the last tree stump, the front yard looked like an archeological excavation for 6 full months!)

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Simple solution. My neighbors probably think I'm nuts, but after our recent snowstorm I went out and shoveled in a tee shirt. It was well below freezing, but you don't want to get wet in the cold. Moving around keeps you warm.
--
Dan Espen

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On 2/23/2016 11:52 AM, Dan Espen wrote:

I did that for our last two snowfalls -- I think one was 5 years ago, the other closer to 12 (?)
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 12:20:06 -0700, Don Y

0F with 45 MPH winds you don't go out and shovel in a tee shirt!!!
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On 2/23/2016 5:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Try chopping ice off the windshield of a car at -26F with a windchill of -83!
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 19:28:05 -0700, Don Y

A guy I taught with some 40 years ago used to work on the DEW line - in the deep freeze of the far north they used 3 ton trucks to carry half ton loads to keep from breaking springs, and breaking grader blades in half was a common occurrence while maintaining the ice roads. They had quick couplers on the cooling systems of all the engines so they could plug a "hot" engine onto a cold one to warm it enough to get it started.
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On 2/23/2016 7:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Cousin lived in ND for a while supervising a job site. He told me that all the cars have block heaters (I only installed a block heater in ONE car that I owned).
And, that NO ONE forgets to feed the parking meters -- apparently they don't even need "meter maids"; there is an electric outlet on the meter for you to connect your block heater. When your time on the meter expires, the electricity is shut off!
Sounds like an excellent, self-enforcing incentive!
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2016 19:37:39 -0700, Don Y

But what do you do when there is no electricity available to run the heater??? On my brother's OTR rig we fixed that problem and the bunk heat problem by installing a propane RV water heater in the heater hose.. Whenhe was "home" up at Ripley in the winter the truck had to stay out by the road, and prior to installing the heater the rig idled all weekend, or there was no way it would start.
With the propane heater he could fire it up for two hours before leaving and have a warm cab AND an engine that started like it was May. ( and he could overnight with the engine shut down on the coldest night and be comfy in the bunk, and be assured the truck would start in the morning)
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On 2/23/2016 9:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hydrionic mouth to mouth resuscitation.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca writes:

Agree.
Guessing 25F light wind, 5MPH, daytime and sunny.
The night before during the storm, sweatshirt.
I've been told, humidity makes a huge difference. It's humid in the NE so we feel the cold more.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

We are tucked down between the great lakes - so yes, it can be quite humid here too.
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Per Dan Espen:

Bunch of years ago the church leaned on us to put up a couple of kids that were touring with a choir from Minnesota.
One kid said their farm had been snowed in for something like 2 weeks before he left and the other was talking about temperatures in the high teens being the norm.
This was Philadelphia in December: maritime climate, temps in the low forties, fairly high humidity.
Both kids said they had never felt so cold in all their lives.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 2/24/2016 6:59 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

Growing up on the gulf coast, I believe that.
When we have those cold, crisp days, with lots of sunshine in the winter, it just doesn't seem bad at all.
However, when we have "Indiana" winter days, cold, grey, and gloomy, it feels much colder
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Per Dan Espen:

Long time ago, I flew out to Albuquerque NM for a job interview at the local electric company.
Seemed like most of the linemen were Native Americans.
I noticed that they showed a noticeable distaste for coming into the main office building where I was hanging out for the interview/tour of the facility.... they'd stand outside while whoever on the crew just *had* to go inside to do whatever had to be done.
--
Pete Cresswell

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