Getting 110 volts in a 220 volt Pumphouse

Page 3 of 3  
Steve B. wrote:

Or just put two 120 V bulbs in series.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Someone wrote:

Not exactly (In most North American 110 - 0 - 110 volt residential/single phase farm systems). Although the term phase/s is sometimes, incorrectly, used for each of the two 'legs', each of which are 110 volts to the neutral or zero volt centre tap from the electric utility distribution transformer. The two leads are normally the two 'ends' of a single, 'single phase' 220 volt, centre tapped winding. One way to look at it is; while one end is at positive polarity the other end is at negative polarity etc. hence 110 volts and 110 volts = 220! In other words the two 'legs' are of the same phase but opposite polarity. If the two wires were truly, say two phases of a 3 phase system, their voltages would be some 120 degrees 'out of phase' i.e. (apart). Seems that to install a pump-house light there might be three 'safe' alternatives? 1) Use a 220 volt bulb. 2) Use two 110 volt bulbs in series. 3) Use a small transformer to 'transform' the 220 to 110 volts. This would conventionally be a 2 to 1 'step down' transformer capable of carrying say, 100 watts. 4) Illegal; not necessarily safe and might lead to disqualification of insurance? is to use the ground as a neutral return! Notes: 1) Simplest and cheapest? 2) Make sure everyone understands it. 3) Seems unnecessarily expensive. 4) Not recommended at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.