Get rid of your ladder

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Get one of these instead
http://images.businessweek.com/ss/09/07/0729_IDEA_awards_gold/4.htm
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...and bank account.
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I can rent a lot of scaffold for two grand...
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Looks deadly unsteady, especially at 14'. Note there is no ballast on that small-foot printed base. Good maybe for changing light bulbs and nothing else. Hopefully looks are deceiving.
Lefty
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Lefty wrote:

It appears to have about the same footprint as a regular stepladder width. The depth of the footprint is shorter than a normal stepladder, but since it's about the same as a normal stepladder width the overall stability should be the same as the side to side stability of a stepladder. The safety harness shown is utterly useless however, since it definitely does not have the stability to support a user falling out of the basket. Just another cutsey solution to a problem that doesn't exist, designed by someone who has never actually used either a ladder or a real aerial lift.
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You must have missed this part: Design: Geoff Campbell and Jason Watson of JLG Industries (Australia);
For the people that may have never heard of JLG Welcome to JLG
JLG Industries, Inc. is the world's leading designer, manufacturer and marketer of access equipment. The Company's diverse product portfolio includes leading brands such as JLG aerial work platforms; JLG, SkyTrak and Lull telehandlers; and an array of complementary accessories that increase the versatility and efficiency of these products.
JLG is an Oshkosh Corporation Company [NYSE: OSK].
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I didn't miss it, and I've used JLG's "real" products in the past. It makes no difference to my assessment.
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Smitty Two wrote:

As I said, it looks like something designed by a person who has never used a ladder or a "real" aerial lift. I stand by that assessment, regardless of who may have designed it.

I own scaffolding, and I can assure you that I can, working solo, assemble scaffolding to reach anything that this silly little lift can reach, in less than 30 minutes. Indeed I have assembled this size scaffold solo numerous times for other applications.
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re: "I can, working solo, assemble scaffolding to reach anything that this silly little lift can reach, in less than 30 minutes"
The article (and related video) state 30 *seconds*, not 30 minutes, to assemble the lift once on site.
I don't know squat about scaffolding, so this is a serious question:
What would said scaffolding weigh and could a solo worker carry it to the work site in one trip?
This article gives a little more detail about the design theory and designer:
http://www.constructioncontractor.com.au/article/Engineered-in-Australia-for-the-world/502746.aspx
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Might work on flat floor (if the battery doesn't go down half way up), but would be worthless out of doors. Bob-tx
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Yeah, I wondered about that too. There's no mention of a manual crank for lowering it if that happens. "Honey, can you bring me a ladder??"

I agree with the other poster who said this looks like it was designed by somebody who's never used either a ladder or a real aerial lift.
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I could use it to paint my great room ceiling, if "working height" is the height of the platform. I wouldn't pay for one just for that and I'd have no place to put it, but it would come in handy.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

So, what advantage would it have over a normal stepladder of the same working height? The only advantage I see is in cleaning out your bank account vs. the cost of a normal ladder. Perhaps if you had some insane ADA mandate you provide assistive technology to allow an wheelchair bound employee to change light bulbs...
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Pete C. wrote: ...

What I see would be the 360 access owing to the platform plus not standing on rungs for long-duration tasks. Didn't notice load limit but hands-free "climbing" to allow taking work material up w/ one would also be handy often...
The potential disadvantage I see is the rearward tilt to maintain COG within the base would make reach in the forward direction problematic perhaps if needed access both directions; otherwise turn around from way the guy in the picture is facing for a wall-access task.
And, a 14-ft "working" height will cover a lot of areas but in church sanctuary where a small elevator prevents any lift I've tried from being taken off the ground floor level it wouldn't reach...I've done the ladder thingie in there tied off and it ain't for the weak of heart...something like this that could do half-again the height would be on my hit list in a heartbeat.
--
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dpb wrote:

Have you tried the small Genie telescopic lifts? Not the self propelled ones, but the simple manual roll around and set outrigger ones with a multi stage forklift style column.
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Pete C. wrote: ...

Probably not every one manufactured, no. All the ones local rental had or could get w/o excessive ship-in charges, yes... None would make it into the elevator. :(
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dpb wrote:

For situations like that, the place that has the access problem should generally be buying the correct specialty lift to have on site all the time. The lift needed probably isn't that expensive, but is just enough outside of what the average renter needs for the rental places to carry. Certainly I've seen Genie lifts that will fit through small doorways, have low minimum heights and will readily load on their side into a standard van for transport.
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Pete C. wrote: ...

...
Church and $$ for this capital outlay don't correlate...
--
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dpb wrote:

I don't know about that, they all appear to be high profit, low overhead, tax free businesses to me...
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Pete C. wrote:

Well, I can assure you this one surely isn't any profit...
--
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