Germans Hoarding Light Bulbs (No CFL)


Even in socialist countries, people are rebelling against excessive government control. They aren't the only ones.
Over the last six months, we have purchased normal (non-government) light bulbs to last us twenty years, longer than we will live.
Bob-tx 07/27/2009
Germans Hoarding Traditional Light Bulbs
The staggered phase out of energy-wasting light bulbs begins on Sept. 1 in Germany. The unpopularity of the energy-saving compact fluorescent bulbs that will replace them is leading consumers and retailers to start hoarding the traditional bulbs.
As the Sept. 1 deadline for the implementation of the first phase of the EU's ban on incandescent light bulbs approaches, shoppers, retailers and even museums are hoarding the precious wares -- and helping the manufacturers make a bundle.
Germans are hoarding traditional incandescent light bulbs as their planned phase out -- in favor of energy-saving compact flourescent bulbs -- approaches.
The EU ban, adopted in March, calls for the gradual replacement of traditional light bulbs with supposedly more energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs (CFL). The first to go, on Sept. 1, will be 100-watt bulbs. Bulbs of other wattages will then gradually fall under the ban, which is expected to cover all such bulbs by Sept. 1, 2012.
Hardware stores and home-improvement chains in Germany are seeing massive increases in the sales of the traditional bulbs. Obi reports a 27 percent growth in sales over the same period a year ago. Hornbach has seen its frosted-glass light bulb sales increase by 40-112 percent. When it comes to 100-watt bulbs, Max Bahr has seen an 80 percent jump in sales, while the figure has been 150 percent for its competitor Praktiker.
"It's unbelievable what is happening," says Werner Wiesner, the head of Megaman, a manufacturer of energy-saving bulbs. Wiesner recounts a story of how one of his field representatives recently saw a man in a hardware store with a shopping cart full of light bulbs of all types worth more than ?200 ($285). "That's enough for the next 20 years."
And hoarding doesn't seem to be just a customer phenomenon. The EU law only forbids producing and importing incandescent bulbs but does not outlaw their sale. "We've stocked up well," a spokesman for Praktiker told SPIEGEL.
And what's ironic -- in the short term, at least -- is that the companies that manufacture the climate-killing bulbs are seeing a big boost in sales. According to the GfK market research company, sales in Germany of incandescent light bulbs between January and April 20, 2009, saw a 20 percent jump over the same period a year earlier, while CFL sales shrank by 2 percent.
'Light Bulb Socialism'
The EU's ban was originally meant to help it reach its targets on energy efficiency and climate protection. Though much cheaper to buy, incandescent bulbs have long been seen as wasteful because only 5 percent of the energy they consume goes to light production, with the rest just becoming heat.
And consumers were also supposed to feel a positive effect in their pocketbooks as well. European Energy Commission Andris Piebalgs has estimated that the average European household will save ?50 per year on electricity bills and that annual CO2 emissions in Europe will be cut by 15 millions tons.
DER SPIEGEL Schedule for the implementation of the EU ban on flourescent light bulbs. But -- like laws on bent cucumbers -- many have mocked the light bulb legislation as just another example of an EU bureaucracy gone wild. Holger Krahmer, for example, a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) from Germany's business-friendly FDP party has accused the EU of imposing 'light bulb socialism."
In fact, in creating this legislation, the EU failed to address consumer preferences and the reservations of a number of other groups. For example, many have complained that the light emitted by a CFL bulb is colder and weaker and that its high-frequency flickering can cause headaches. Then there are complaints about the mercury the CFL bulbs contain, how there is no system for disposing of them in a convenient and environmentally friendly way, and how they allegedly result in exposure to radiation levels higher than allowed under international guidelines.
For some, the issue is also one of broken promises. For example, manufacturers of CFL bulbs justify their higher prices by claiming that they last much longer than traditional bulbs. But a recent test by the environmentally-oriented consumer-protection magazine ko Test found that 16 of the 32 bulb types tested gave up the ghost after 6,000 hours of use -- or much earlier than their manufacturers had promised.
And then, of course, there's the issue of the light the bulbs emit. Many complain that the lights are just not bright enough and that they falsify colors. The Hamburger Kunsthalle, for example, recently made a bulk order for 600 incandescent light bulbs to make sure that it can keep illuminating the works it displays in the time-honored way.
The aesthetic issue is a powerful one. For Munich-based lighting designer Ingo Maurer, the CFL bulbs are ushering in a decrease in the quality of life. "We recommend protests against the ban, civil disobedience and the timely hoarding of lighting implements," Maurer told SPIEGEL. He also adds that he believes the ban might drive more people to use more candles, which are about as bad as you can get in terms of energy efficiency.
As Wiesner sees it, Brussels did it all wrong. Rather than banning incandescent bulbs, Wiesner argues, it should have slapped a ?5 surcharge on every incandescent bulb, arguing that it would have made people think a bit more before buying them. "That move alone would have been enough to allow the EU to achieve its goal," Wiesner says.
Reported by Alexander Jung
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countries, people are rebelling against excessive government control.&nbsp; They aren't the only ones.&nbsp; <BR><BR>Over the last six months, we have purchased normal (non-government) light bulbs to last us twenty years, longer than we will live.<BR><BR>Bob-tx<BR>07/27/2009 <BR><BR>Germans Hoarding Traditional Light Bulbs<BR><BR>The staggered phase out of energy-wasting light bulbs begins on Sept. 1 in Germany. The unpopularity of the energy-saving compact fluorescent bulbs that will replace them is leading consumers and retailers to start hoarding the traditional bulbs.<BR><BR>As the Sept. 1 deadline for the implementation of the first phase of the EU's ban on incandescent light bulbs approaches, shoppers, retailers and even museums are hoarding the precious wares -- and helping the manufacturers make a bundle.<BR><BR>Germans are hoarding traditional incandescent light bulbs as their planned phase out -- in favor of energy-saving compact flourescent bulbs -- approaches.<BR><BR>The EU ban, adopted in March, calls for the gradual replacement of traditional light bulbs with supposedly more energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs (CFL). The first to go, on Sept. 1, will be 100-watt bulbs. Bulbs of other wattages will then gradually fall under the ban, which is expected to cover all such bulbs by Sept. 1, 2012.<BR><BR>Hardware stores and home-improvement chains in Germany are seeing massive increases in the sales of the traditional bulbs. Obi reports a 27 percent growth in sales over the same period a year ago. Hornbach has seen its frosted-glass light bulb sales increase by 40-112 percent. When it comes to 100-watt bulbs, Max Bahr has seen an 80 percent jump in sales, while the figure has been 150 percent for its competitor Praktiker.<BR><BR>"It's unbelievable what is happening," says Werner Wiesner, the head of Megaman, a manufacturer of energy-saving bulbs. Wiesner recounts a story of how one of his field representatives recently saw a man in a hardware store with a shopping cart full of light bulbs of all types worth more than ?200 ($285). "That's enough for the next 20 years."<BR><BR>And hoarding doesn't seem to be just a customer phenomenon. The EU law only forbids producing and importing incandescent bulbs but does not outlaw their sale. "We've stocked up well," a spokesman for Praktiker told SPIEGEL. <BR><BR>And what's ironic -- in the short term, at least -- is that the companies that manufacture the climate-killing bulbs are seeing a big boost in sales. According to the GfK market research company, sales in Germany of incandescent light bulbs between January and April 20, 2009, saw a 20 percent jump over the same period a year earlier, while CFL sales shrank by 2 percent.<BR><BR>'Light Bulb Socialism' <BR><BR>The EU's ban was originally meant to help it reach its targets on energy efficiency and climate protection. Though much cheaper to buy, incandescent bulbs have long been seen as wasteful because only 5 percent of the energy they consume goes to light production, with the rest just becoming heat.<BR><BR>And consumers were also supposed to feel a positive effect in their pocketbooks as well. European Energy Commission Andris Piebalgs has estimated that the average European household will save ?50 per year on electricity bills and that annual CO2 emissions in Europe will be cut by 15 millions tons.<BR><BR>&nbsp;DER SPIEGEL<BR>Schedule for the implementation of the EU ban on flourescent light bulbs.<BR>But -- like laws on bent cucumbers -- many have mocked the light bulb legislation as just another example of an EU bureaucracy gone wild. Holger Krahmer, for example, a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) from Germany's business-friendly FDP party has accused the EU of imposing 'light bulb socialism."<BR><BR>In fact, in creating this legislation, the EU failed to address consumer preferences and the reservations of a number of other groups. For example, many have complained that the light emitted by a CFL bulb is colder and weaker and that its high-frequency flickering can cause headaches. Then there are complaints about the mercury the CFL bulbs contain, how there is no system for disposing of them in a convenient and environmentally friendly way, and how they allegedly result in exposure to radiation levels higher than allowed under international guidelines.<BR><BR>For some, the issue is also one of broken promises. For example, manufacturers of CFL bulbs justify their higher prices by claiming that they last much longer than traditional bulbs. But a recent test by the environmentally-oriented consumer-protection magazine ko Test found that 16 of the 32 bulb types tested gave up the ghost after 6,000 hours of use -- or much earlier than their manufacturers had promised.<BR><BR>And then, of course, there's the issue of the light the bulbs emit. Many complain that the lights are just not bright enough and that they falsify colors. The Hamburger Kunsthalle, for example, recently made a bulk order for 600 incandescent light bulbs to make sure that it can keep illuminating the works it displays in the time-honored way.<BR><BR>&nbsp;The aesthetic issue is a powerful one. For Munich-based lighting designer Ingo Maurer, the CFL bulbs are ushering in a decrease in the quality of life. "We recommend protests against the ban, civil disobedience and the timely hoarding of lighting implements," Maurer told SPIEGEL. He also adds that he believes the ban might drive more people to use more candles, which are about as bad as you can get in terms of energy efficiency.<BR><BR>As Wiesner sees it, Brussels did it all wrong. Rather than banning incandescent bulbs, Wiesner argues, it should have slapped a ?5 surcharge on every incandescent bulb, arguing that it would have made people think a bit more before buying them. "That move alone would have been enough to allow the EU to achieve its goal," Wiesner says.<BR><BR>Reported by Alexander Jung<BR></FONT></BODY></HTML> ------=
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

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wrote:

Thanks. Had you not posted, I would've never knew the EU repealed the Straight Banana, Curvy Cucumber Laws. I had to look at the "bent cucumber" law.
In December they removed the laws.
"(Newser Summary) The EU took a U-turn on curved cucumbers and bent bananas and voted to repeal strict laws that ban the sale of imperfect produce, the Washington Post reports. Shops are barred from selling cauliflower less than 4.33 inches in diameter and not-green-enough asparagus until July, when such lawslong mocked by the British tabloidswill be wiped for 26 fruits and vegetables."
How many bulbs did you buy?
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have had very few bulb failures. We bought 40, 76, 100, 3-way, flood, and candelabra bulbs, based on the number of each type fixture we have, and then bought enough for two refills of each socket.
Bob-tx
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Bob-tx wrote:

They are all retarded. I have been using CFLs for over a decade. I'm waiting for the next generation white LED's which are much more efficient than CFLs. Some LED are available but the price is still high.
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wrote:

Depends on your power company. Our nearly 125 volts is really hard on regular lightbulbs. I would have to have a shed to hold a lifetime supply. Switching to cf has saved me that trouble.
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wrote:

I have to buy 130v bulbs but they hold up well.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I tried some of those (they called them extended life bulbs at the time), but the light they produced was too warm/yellow for my tastes. I've also got 125VAC at the wall, so I just change them more often.
Jon
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On Jul 30, 1:10pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I put some 130 volts bulbs in a lamp that is difficult to change. I thought the bulbs would last a year or so and make this a once a year choir. They have been working now for 15 years.
Jimmie
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Lighthouse10 had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Germans-Hoarding-Light-Bulbs-No-CFL-386326-.htm :
Hardly surprising about the German (and other European) hoarding Bob...
Europeans and Americans choose to buy ordinary light bulbs around 9 times out of 10. Banning <b>what people want</b> gives the supposed savings - no point in banning an impopular product!
If new LED lights -or improved CFLs- <b>are good</b>, people will buy them - no need to ban ordinary light bulbs (little point). If they are not good, people will not buy them - no need to ban ordinary light bulbs (no point). The arrival of the transistor didn't mean that more energy using radio tubes had to be banned... they were bought less anyway.
<b>All lights have advantages</b>The ordinary simple light bulb has for many people a pleasing appearance, it responds quickly with bright broad spectrum light, is easy to use with dimmers and other equipment, can come in small sizes, and has safely been used for over 100 years.
<b>100 W+ equivalent brightness</b> is a particular issue - difficult andexpensive with both fluorescents and LEDS - yet such incandescent bulbs are first in line for banning in both America and the EU
<b>Energy?</b> Since when does Europe or America need to save on electricity? There is no energy shortage. Note that if there was an energy shortage, the price rise would make people buy more efficient products anyway - no need to legislate for it.
Energy security? There are usually plenty of local energy sources, Middle East oil is not used for electricity generation, 1/2 world uranium exports are from Canada and Australia.
Consumers - not politicians - pay for the energy used. Certainly it is good to let people know how they can save energy and money - but why force them to do it?
<b>Emissions?</b> Most cars have emissions. But does a light bulb give out any gases? Power stations might not either: In Sweden and France, as in Washington state practically all electricity is emission-free, while around half of it is in many European countries and in states like New York and California. Why should emission-free households be denied the use of lighting they obviously want to use? Low emission households will increase everywhere, since emissions will be reduced anyway through the planned use of coal/gas processing technology or energy substitution.
Also, the savings amounts can be questioned for many reasons: For a referenced list of reasons against light bulb bans, see http://www.ceolas.net/#li1x onwards
Even if a reduction in use <b>was</b> needed, then <b>taxation</b> to reduce consumption would make more sense since government can use the income to reduce emissions (home insulation schemes, renewable projects etc) more than any remaining product use causes such problems. People can still buy what they want, unlike with bans. However taxation on electrical appliances is hardly needed either, and is in principle wrong for similar reasons to bans (for example, emission-free households are hit too).
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