Geothermal heat pumps ?

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Anybody know about geothermal heat pumps? I looked at a house with three of these things and I really dont know much about them.
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Check here, lots of info about geothermal heat pumps http://tinyurl.com/br4tr2
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

I can tell you that they take quite a bit of electricity to run even though the heat is free.
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Van Chocstraw
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wrote:

Which is nonsense. Geothermal may be expensive to install, but the amount of electricity they take doesn't change the fact that they are low cost to operate compared to nat gas, oil, electric, etc.
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Had one (recirculating ground loop) in E TN.
Most excellent ( :) ) -- was <1/3rd operating cost of air-exchange heat pump it replaced.
Last I knew a couple years ago it was still working and pleasing new homeowner which would have been about 15 years then...
I had nothing but good experience personally.
Oklahoma State University and TVA (TN Valley Authority) were two of best information sources when was looking but I've not really kept up but I'd suggest trying there.
Water Furnace (Canadian) was the manufacturer of our unit--they have one of best reputations; I don't know anything specific about others for comparisons.
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I have one.
You need to find out if they are the "Air Transfer" heat pumps or if they are actually geothermal heat pumps. That must be a hell of a big house for three of them. I would want to see the electricity usage for the last couple of winters before I would buy such a place.
Mine is an Air Transfer heat pump and it does not do a good job heating the house when the temps get down in 20's. It uses a hell of a lot of electricity too.
For cooling the house in the summer it uses less electricity than when I used two window air conditioners.
Before next winter, I will be looking at trying to get a better primary heat source for my house. I will see if the Oil furnace that is still in the basement can still be hooked up to the existing heat pump unit. I might be able to use the oil furnace as a back-up for the heat pump and have it kick on when the temps get down to 30 degrees or so.
David
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He said geothermal, which is NOT a traditonal air exchange heat pump.

Who the hell cares? Would it be so much better if it was heated with oil, regardless of the size? I'd be happy to buy a house that was fairly valued overall, with a geothermal system.

No shit? Did you check the electric bills for the last 2 winters before you bought a place with a heat pump and 20 deg winters?

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On Feb 4, 2:48 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

What's your problem dude? Can't you write a post without the bullshit insults?
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You have one what? Since subject is geothermal, you have a geothermal? But below you say you have an Air Transfer heat pump. You have both? Just what are you saying?

This is ancient info. That's why they have heat strips. I personally found it did not use much electricity since the heat strips rarely kicked on. Depends on your climate and how well your system is running so the heat strips don't kick on prematurely. Also, if you have a tendency to bump it up more than a couple of degrees at a time instead of stages that'll light up the strips.
It uses a hell of a

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Sorry, I should have been more clear. I have an Air Transfer heat pump that my idiot nephew in law talked me into letting him install 3 years ago.
I guess the waste of money on this thing has made it a bit of a hot button issue for me so I must have seen "heat pump" and jumped right in.

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wrote:

I was brought up in the northeast and never even saw a heat pump until I was 39 (errr, correction, 50). First time I owned a place that had one was NC. I swore the thing was broke. Frikkin air is not even a hundred degrees coming out! :-) Takes some getting used to.
Heat pumps have their place and can be a money saver providing they are:
- Used in the right climate. - Properly sized - Have a properly matched coil - Have a proper air handler. - Have proper ductwork - Been properly maintained. - Not being used when it's near it's last leg.
If any of these are out of whack the whole thing will appear to be a lemon. I've seen units where the air filter is never/rarely changed. Thing just burns itself up overworking. Then there's the ones who run it without a filter. Frikkin coil is like so crudded up you can grow veggies in it.
I am no HVAC guy by any means. I'm more HAC(k) when it comes to this. Just passing along what I've learned from an experienced 25yr HVAC company owner. There's some experienced HVAC people in this group who would be quick to correct anything I've said that is BS though.
Where are you located? Other people around have heat pumps that seem to work OK?

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I'm in lower Michigan about 30 mile north of Indiana.
I don't know if anyone around here has an air transfer heat pump. My niece's husband (now ex husband) had a reputation for being a good heating/air conditioning guy. They lived down in Indiana and I was getting tired of paying so much for heating oil for the old stove. He recommended a heat pump. Due to all the crap he has pulled on my niece after she caught him with the neighbor lady, I don't think I want him around any more.
What I really need is a good back-up system for when it gets under 40 degrees. I think the air transfer heat pump will work fine at higher temps than that. My plan right now is before next winter to get the local guy out that always worked on my old oil furnace and see if it can be hooked back up in the system or at least see what he recommends.
BTW, here is exactly what I have. I live in an old farm house that was first built in 1910 but has been added on to several times since. The downstairs has a great room with the living room and kitchen. Off that is the bed room and off that is the bathroom/laundry room.
The pellet stove does a good job heating the living room and kitchen but not enough heat gets to the bedroom and bathroom. Also, the pellet stove need service from time to time. I moved the thermostat for the heat pump to the bedroom so the heat from the pellet stove would not effect it.
If I could depend on the pellet stove all the time, I would not have as much of a problem. But it breaks down sometimes when I am not home or in the middle of the night. Last night I came home about 7:30 to find that the pellet stove had malfunctioned. It was about 7 degrees outside and only 58 degrees in the living room and 63 degrees in the bedroom where the heat pump thermostat is. By the time I got the pellet stove running again and got the house back up to a comfortable temp, it was after midnight.
The think I like about the heat pump is that it is a damn good and efficient air conditioning unit. Which is why I want to keep it so I don't lose my investment in that end. I think that if I had my oil furnace working again, it would keep the pellet stove from having to work so much and the pellet stove would help keep the furnace oil usage down to an affordable level.
David
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I have no experiance with them. I would want to see utility and repair bills, have the system reviewed by his installer maintenance guy and someone else. I have heard of units poorly designed, maybe undersized that never gave full comfort without expensive electric resistance heat. I would want a home owner guarntee of some sort of performance guide line. So I would know I would not need additional AC or expensive heating, or a wood stove. His utility bills should tell all but maybe they take 65f in winter and 82f in summer instead of running it, the seller wont tell you all. Is there a well used wood stove there.
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Good grief! This from a guy that rants on the virtues of tankless water heaters? What the hell is so controversial about the operating costs of geothermal? Sure, they are more expensive to install, but if he's getting a house with it, it's a non-issue. Unless you want to argue that heat pumps are a poor choice with 50 deg water.
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Good grief! This from a guy that rants on the virtues of tankless water heaters? What the hell is so controversial about the operating costs of geothermal? Sure, they are more expensive to install, but if he's getting a house with it, it's a non-issue. Unless you want to argue that heat pumps are a poor choice with 50 deg water.
My Waterfurnace units (2 for approx 4000 sq. ft.) have been in service for 15 years. Electricity cost is well below neighbor who has standard heat pump and smaller home. Also, geo's pre-heat hot water so cost for hot H2O is down.
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On Feb 4, 12:51pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Do you have a tankless WH, I guess no. I thought I was pointing out to be sure it works right, improper instals dont, but you never heard of that?
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On Wed, 4 Feb 2009 12:05:31 -0800 (PST), ransley

hehe. The guy has a question about Geo and ransley turns it into a tankless water heater. You flippin dork-meat-head. The only thing installed wrong is your brain. Someone stuck it in your arse. Bubba
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wrote:

[Bubba is wooing Ransley again. He's in the mood.]
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On Wed, 4 Feb 2009 05:36:16 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@juno.com"

I know of a geothermal system just installed this summer. You get a reduced electricity rate for the separate electric meter used with a geothermal system. This particular system cost about $20,000 but you do get a one time large tax break.
The first winter bill was $30. The last bill $50. This is 3500 square foot ranch including the basement in lower Michigan where temps have been in single digits for quite some time now.
The house was formally heated with fuel oil at a cost of $3000 a year. Total geothermal heating and cooling cost for a year are projected to be around $500
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Check www.waterfurnace.com This is a great site for all things geo with links to other sites as well. WaterFurnace is based out of Ft. Wayne, Indiana.
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