Genrator and Auto Transfer Switch

I have a functioning 10kw Generac propane generator with an automatic transfer switch. Circuits from the original panel were of course fed to the transfer panel. The outside generator feed goes into an external box and the line then enters the house and goes into the auto transfer switch. All standard installation I presume.
I have a question: if the generator is removed and the power line from the generator to the outside box is simply disconnected will all the circuits in the transfer switch continue to function normally as long as the main panel has power from the utility company. Simply put if the generator is taken away will all the circuits in the main [panel and the transfer switch continue to function or must the circuits that were put in the transfer switch be reconnected in the main electric panel. I don't believe it is necessary but...................Thank you..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IF you lose power, there will be nothing to transfer and the circuit will end. It will not hurt to cap it off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Obviously if power is lost and there is no generator nothing will transfer. That's not the question.
"Meanie" wrote in message

IF you lose power, there will be nothing to transfer and the circuit will end. It will not hurt to cap it off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...and I stated it will not hurt if you cap it off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/8/2012 8:19 PM, Meanie wrote:

The low voltage control lines run from the transfer switch indoors to the generator outdoors. Once the outdoor unit is removed, there is no relay switching current source to energize the transfer switch, and thus the switch will never try to transfer.
The low voltage is produced at the generator, runs through the conduit to the indoor transfer switch (where it is fused on both sides) and is then applied to the transfer switch solenoid when the generator has reached stable output after a brief warm-up. Obviously none of this can or will happen once the outside generator is detached.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Smarty" wrote in message
The low voltage control lines run from the transfer switch indoors to the generator outdoors. Once the outdoor unit is removed, there is no relay switching current source to energize the transfer switch, and thus the switch will never try to transfer.
The low voltage is produced at the generator, runs through the conduit to the indoor transfer switch (where it is fused on both sides) and is then applied to the transfer switch solenoid when the generator has reached stable output after a brief warm-up. Obviously none of this can or will happen once the outside generator is detached.

Thanks. The low voltage aspect is very informative. I assume it is correct to conclude that the circuits that were moved into the transfer switch from the main panel when the system was originally installed will continue to function normally as long as the breaker feeding the transfer switch remains ON and as long as utility company power is present ? Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is what everyone has said and I agree
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2012 10:38 AM, John F. F. wrote:

Glad to help John. Many people have helped me here with problems and issues I have needed help with.
First, to clarify, "the breaker feeding the transfer switch" you refer to is actually the breaker which provides utility power to the generator. If it is turned off, the generator will start up, just as if a utility power outage has occurred.
The "special" circuits which were moved to the transfer switch enclosure will only get their power switched when the low voltage control signal to the generator is received, and this only happens when the utility power to the generator (via the aforementioned breaker) is interrupted. These circuits are then switched to the generator bus by the transfer switch. They otherwise are connected to the utility bus, the other set of contacts / poles on the transfer switch.
Therefore, if the generator were to be entirely removed, the special circuits will always stay connected to utility power and function as they did before the installation of the generator.
This is a very nice design (speaking as an electrical engineer and electronics hardware designer !!) and works just as you would want it to.
Hope this answers your question.
Smarty
BTW, the generator schematics and all service info is on the Generac website should you wish to get the full details downloaded in pdf format.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/9/2012 10:38 AM, John F. F. wrote:

Glad to help John. Many people have helped me here with problems and issues I have needed help with.
First, to clarify, "the breaker feeding the transfer switch" you refer to is actually the breaker which provides utility power to the generator. If it is turned off, the generator will start up, just as if a utility power outage has occurred.
The "special" circuits which were moved to the transfer switch enclosure will only get their power switched when the low voltage control signal to the generator is received, and this only happens when the utility power to the generator (via the aforementioned breaker) is interrupted. These circuits are then switched to the generator bus by the transfer switch. They otherwise are connected to the utility bus, the other set of contacts / poles on the transfer switch.
Therefore, if the generator were to be entirely removed, the special circuits will always stay connected to utility power and function as they did before the installation of the generator.
This is a very nice design (speaking as an electrical engineer and electronics hardware designer !!) and works just as you would want it to.
Hope this answers your question.
Smarty
BTW, the generator schematics and all service info is on the Generac website should you wish to get the full details downloaded in pdf format.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, August 8, 2012 8:04:10 PM UTC-4, John F. F. wrote:

Yes, but everything was working fine BEFORE power was lost, right?
No generator is the same as generator not running, except for the fact that the lights won't stay lit in your house if there's a general power outage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
why would anyone want to remove a stand by generator?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it was shot and they didn't want to spend the $$ to replace it would be one reason.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just sold a property in NOLA with a standby gen set. Owner does not understand a) standby generator b) New Orleans c) Hurricanes.
Sale contract said to remove, so remove we did. (after a heads up caution to the new owner).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you hear back, please let us know what was the general reaction after the first hurricane. Remove all the crude language, and cussing. On second thought, there won't be much reply, left.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Just sold a property in NOLA with a standby gen set. Owner does not understand a) standby generator b) New Orleans c) Hurricanes.
Sale contract said to remove, so remove we did. (after a heads up caution to the new owner).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.