Generators, run on nat. gas....

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wrote:

I want a conversion kit to run my snow blower on Natural Gas.
Oh yeah...and a long flexible hose.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

No need for the hose if you get a conversion kit for propane. Couple of coat-hangers to attach the tank to the handle-bars and you're good to go.
You may have to hook up a heater for the propane tank... or use butane.
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Butane freezes at much higher temps than propane - butane ~-0.5°C, propane ~-40°F/C. See <http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/501hcboilingpts.html
--
Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

Nope.
The freezing (melting) point of butane is -138°C, the boiling point is -0.5°C. (~+30°F) The freezing (melting) point of propane is -190°C, its boiling point is -42°C (~-44°F)
You don't actually burn propane or butane; you burn the vapor/gas. In lower ambient temperatures, it's harder for the liquid to turn into a gas. Anything below the boiling point temperatures above, and you'll get nothing.
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Sorry, I meant indeed boiling point. So generally there is noneed to heat propane tanks, but butane can get problematic near freezing.
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Best regards
Han
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in news:jcb6c7puqsl119j5jlv21cr4sj5nth9tfr@ 4ax.com:

I didn't know that. Thanks!
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Best regards
Han
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    And here I thought Hell was already flaming.
    Oh wait, that's West Hollywood.
    Never mind.
pyotr
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pyotr
Go not to the Net for answers, for it will tell you Yes and no. And
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Good idea.
I'll get a Natural Gas heater to keep the propane tank warm.
Oh yeah...and a long flexible hose.
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Existential Angst wrote:

Honda (I think it was Honda) was making nat-gas furnaces for the Jap market that included some sort of AC generator that could power the furnace and supply maybe 1000 watts of extra juice. This was about 4 or 5 years ago.
Then there are nat-gas powered AC units, something that really hasn't gained much press here in US/Canada (at least not for the residential market).
I really would like to power more things off nat-gas for the home, especially electricity and AC.
And I really would like to store some decent amount of nat-gas (sort of like playing the markets - buy it in the summer when it's cheap, use it through the winter when everyone else is paying more).
I know this is getting off-topic, but when will we consumers be able to buy large quantities of gasoline, natural gas, and even electricity on some sort of futures market for use at home (or our own car) ?
(not sure why this was x-posted to metalworking...)
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"Home Guy" wrote in message
Existential Angst wrote:

Honda (I think it was Honda) was making nat-gas furnaces for the Jap market that included some sort of AC generator that could power the furnace and supply maybe 1000 watts of extra juice. This was about 4 or 5 years ago.
Then there are nat-gas powered AC units, something that really hasn't gained much press here in US/Canada (at least not for the residential market).
I really would like to power more things off nat-gas for the home, especially electricity and AC.
And I really would like to store some decent amount of nat-gas (sort of like playing the markets - buy it in the summer when it's cheap, use it through the winter when everyone else is paying more).
I know this is getting off-topic, but when will we consumers be able to buy large quantities of gasoline, natural gas, and even electricity on some sort of futures market for use at home (or our own car) ?
(not sure why this was x-posted to metalworking...)
=================================================================== FWIW ( and even less related), back in the late '70s, when fuel prices were out of sight, several large office buildings in NYC installed natural-gas co-generation units for electricity and heating.
Here's the part that got me: They were based on Chevy 396 V8s. The company that installed them said that life was unknown in those engines running natural gas, but it was many times their life running gasoline.
After the petroleum crisis was over, I never heard another word about them. One was in a building just a few blocks from where I worked at the time, in midtown. Skyscrapers don't really need a lot of heat. They have so much waste heat that some of them actually run air conditioners in the winter.
--
Ed Huntress


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I remember seeing something on TV a few years ago about a gasoline futures market for consumers and fleets. You could buy in for as little as $50. Interesting concept.
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You can do it now. Just buy and sell futures. If you work it right, all the folks who don't own them will be paying the difference between your current gas bill, and what you paid for it when it was cheaper.
When you consume your portion of it doesn't matter.
LLoyd
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So, along these lines, I was wondering what would be involved in modifying my Subaru gasoline-powered generator to run from Nat Gas. after having worked as a motorcycle mechanic years ago, I truly hate the smell of gasoline, and it's virtually impossible to pour 6 gallons into the generator's tank without spilling at least a few drops. Even with nitrile gloves, I still have to scrub my hands to make the smell go away.
The 5500W generator will run about 14 hours lightly loaded, but it still means at least one trip to the gas station (if you can find an open one that has gas) and two refillis of the genny per day. It would be great to have gas power.I have a manual transfer switch, and no need for an automatic one. All of my critical stuff is on batter UPS power which gives me plenty of time to fire up the generator.
As for neighbors, we all share. There a lots of people on my block with generators, as our power has been, well, shitty in the past feww years. What I seem to be loaning out more than electricity is extension cords, of which I have plenty. Since I installed the transfer swirtch, I don't really need the extensions, so the neighbors are welcome to them.
In this last storm, one of my neighbor's generator died. The moteor ran fine, but it put out zero volts (well, about 1.25 volts). It was a bad cap (12uF, 325VAC), and I didn't have one in stock. Found one at Granger, but they were closed. That's when I learned something really cool - For an additional $50, they'll send someone to open the store - any time, night or day. My neighbor jumped all over that - $8 for the cap, $50 for the store opening and His wife is gonna cook me up a mess of ribs for my trouble.
In the previous storm, I ran extensions to three neighbors to run their sump pumps, and we spent the rest of the day polishing off a bottle of bourbon, and they bought me cans of gasoline.
So, contrary to Stormin's experience, dealing with my neighbors through stuff like this has been fine. I worried that it might become like the Twilight Zone episode where the guy has a f**ck of a time keeping his neighbors from overrunning his bomb shelter, but nothing like that has happened.
But, does anybody know if it would be possible to do a natural gas conversion to my 13(I think) HP Subaru?
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On Nov 13, 10:38 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

"Survival mode" demands that I be able to work, rather than sitting around enjoying the quiet while my power is out for four days. Last month, I had my cell phone tethered to a windows machine and used internet connection sharing to power up my whole network. With Verizon 4G, it was almost as good as my cable connection, though I didn't have my static IPs.
I also have a sump pump that, during a particularly rainy period, runs as often as every two minutes. If it doesn't run, "enjoying the quiet" rapidly turns into cleaning up water from the basement floor.
Point is, I use my generator for more than running the fridge and furnace. And that was, byu the way, 14 hours at a time before refueling. I actually ran it 24 hours a day, shutting down only for refueling.
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On Nov 13, 10:38 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

During the hurricane in August I ran mine for about 2 hours in the morning, then about 3 hours at night. Main issue was keeping refrigerator and one freezer OK. The 3 hours of lights would be enough at night, but I was spending most of my time at a friends house who had power.
In winter, running it a bit every few hours as needed for heat as you suggest, then a few hours at night for lights, microwave should be all that's needed. Of course there are folks that want an automatic start system that will provide power 24/7. But that's overkill for me and I would not want to subject neighbors or myself to all the noise.
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In article <f2e8c91f-8ced-47ca-8046-

What noise would that be? The neighbor's system makes no more noise in my house than my refrigerator does.
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What brand/type of unit do they use?
The NG Generacs claim 62, 63 db -- which is pretty quiet, but I don't know exactly how quiet that is -- an idling car, an idling car + 500 rpm??
Also, I was thinking of keeping mine inside, as the gas line and breaker panels are close by, and venting the exhaust outside.
Good/bad idear? It would solve the theft problem, f'sure. Mebbe put an inline duct fan to generate some suction, to make sure ALL the exhaust is exhausted.
--
EA



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exhaust outside close to the building can infiltrate back inside. that's why it's recommended to site your generator well away from your house.

to avoid theft,you could put the generator on a 2nd floor patio or roof. that is what some people are doing with their air conditioning units,to avoid copper thieves.
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Jim Yanik
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Which, if installed inside, would suggest a strong duct fan -- mebbe strong enough to blow the exhaust over to my neighbor.... LOL
Oh, apropos of another inneresting post on generator quality, cutting corners, the whole db thing is esp. subject to scamming, as HOW you measure db's is critical -- from 1 ft away or 100 ft away, etc. Don't know if there is a standard, and even if there is, who knows who is adhering to it....

Mebbe an outside shed, with an alarm...
--
EA


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says...

Outside you can clearly hear it start up (it cranks up once a week and runs for a few minutes automatically just to keep everything lubed up and let it be known if there is a probley). Inside if you're in a room on that side of the house and it's really quite you can hear it. It's not what I'd call an obtrusive noise level.

You really need to talk the building inspector about that but my suspicion is that he'll tell you you can't do it.
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