generators in parallel

I have two generators rated at 5 KW each. I know how to phase and put the two in parallel while they are both running. The question is will they stay in sync and put out 10 kw if needed ?
I know the Honda generators have a parallel cord, but think that is for the inverter type. The ones I have are made by two differant companies and just the inexpensive kind that sell for around $ 600 to $ 800 at most stores.
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Probably not. Their outputs are too variable. A little load on one leg will drop the RPMs a bit for a moment on one generator, then BAM, they're out of sync.
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On Jan 29, 6:57�pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

nope sorry it wouldnt work:(
you can use one generator for some loads, and the other for different loads.
call one essential and one nice to have luxuries.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Once paralleled they should stay in synch unless there is a failure like a tripped breaker. Ping Neon John on alt.energy.homepower for more paralleling advice.
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As Monty Python would say... "explain the logic underlying *that* conclusion!"
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The generators can be paralled but the governors are not adequate for load sharing. They will cause uncontrollable surging as both try to control the speed of the locked together rotors.
Don Young
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Really? How are you going to get them in phase and stay in phase?
<Mark
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wrote:

Really? How are you going to get them in phase and stay in phase?
<Mark
It is easy to get them in phase and running together. I have done that many times at work with 3 phase motor generator sets with 50 horsepower or so setups. We have varitable speed equipment that can not be stopped and to work on the motor generator sets we parallel a spare set long enough to take the running set off line. Simplest way is to hook up a voltmeter between them and when the meter goes to zero you throw the switch to put them in parallel. In simple terms the generators become electric motors and one will try to drive the other to the same speed after the electricl connection is made.
My question is really has anyone done this and will it work with the simple home generators.
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wrote:

I understand how you intend to MEASURE the phase with a voltmeter, ok but....
1) how do you propose to vary the speed of a home generator to get it in phase with another?
2) once in phase and you throw the switch to connect them and they lock together, how do you control the throttle settings of both so that they share the load instead of one driving the other...
each home generator has a crude speed control governor on the throttle and if they are not set to ___exactly___ the same speed, the "faster one" will take all the load and the "slower one" will be driven as a motor like you described.... as another poster said, the whole system will probably "hunt" like crazy...
it is an interesting problem but unless you re-design the throttle governors I don't see how you can get this to work..
sounds like a fun thing to try though...
Mark
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....

The getting them paralled is no problem. They have adjustments for the speed. Just not too user adjustable unless you know where and how.
The answer to your # 2 is sort of what I was looking for. They will try to stay in sync for a while, but it may only be a few seconds, or they may stay that way for a long time. I was trying to find out if anyone had ever tried it and if it worked or not. I don't intend to sit and adjust the speed after they are connected but want to rely on the governers to mantain the speed. I hate to blow about $ 1500 if they burn each other up just to be the first one to try it.... Especially now that I just cleaned out the fuel system of one of them due to not running it for a long time and leaving the old fuel in it.
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wrote:

There's a huge difference between two cheap Chinese home generators and two precision industrial units.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Neon John on alt.energy.homepower has reportedly regularly paralleled two of the $100 1kW 2cycle chinese generators without issues.
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I tested a cheap chinese gen, its stability was as good as my 1200.00 unit. Aparently they have good govenors and oversized gen heads, I was impressed.
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I dont think you can do it safely knowing how the govenors are not very good on 5000w gasolene units. Hondas EU have minimal V swing so its a different animal. Maybe 1v vs 3-15 v swing from Honda EU to regular cheap units.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Not that way but you CAN connect one generator to one leg of your 220 volt supply and the other one to the other side. Using 110 volts from each generator for each half of the house and it should work fine.
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Yes maybe if you are using only 110 Volt loads, (and ignoring the fact that you can overlaod the neutral wires.) But I don't think that will work at all if you have 220 Volt loads.
Have you actually done this?
Mark
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

That would not work for any 240V loads as the two sources would be drifting in and out of phase and 240V devices would see wildly varying voltages.
Yes, it is possible to parallel generators and not just the inverter based ones, it has been done daily since the beginning of electric power. It has just been uncommon to parallel small generators.
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