Generator Useage

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wrote:

CO detectors are very important. Florida has added that to the building code. We usually have as many people killed or injured from generators as get hurt in the storm. CO is a major cause.
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Siphons are found at auto parts stores, and in the auto parts sections of most department stores. Many 5,000 watt generators have the "extended run" 5 galon fuel tank. Which is fine, a lot more convenient than having to gas up every hour. Generators tend to be noisy, so please plan your usage for daylight. So you don't keep your neighborhood kids awake.
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Dottie wrote:

Dottie -
Yes, I have a battery-operated CO detector that I put in a "prominent" location especially when running the generator. I believe the rule of thumb is to keep the generator exhaust at least 10 ft from the house (including attached garage) though I admit that I run my small generator closer, approx 5 ft, with the exhaust pointed away.
One thing you might think about is how to protect the generator, without overly restricting the air intake or exhaust, since the weather will likely not be very good when you have to use it. In my case, I've rigged up a simple plywood/tarp "roof" that I had the chance to test during a recent power outage from severe thunderstorms. It worked. :)
As for siphons: I have a common el cheapo bulb-and-tube sold by most auto supply stores but, after doing a little research on the web, I got a "Super Siphon" -- actually ended up with two versions (one with a brass tip and one with a nylon tip which I feel more comfortable using with gasoline) for the price of one; it's a very simple, self-priming 6 ft. long 3/8" or 1/2" diam. poly tube. One thing you might want to check before you need it is whether your siphon works on your car gas tank. Some newer tanks have a design that prevents siphoning.
Good luck.
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16 gage extension cords work fine, for most things. Might buy more (ouch) gasoline. Generator can use as much as a galon an hour, under heavy load.
About the only time I use my generator, is to run the furnace for winter power cuts. About an hour, before bedtime. Bring the generator indoors at night, they are very commonly stolen.
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On May 29, 7:40�pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

if power is out, local stations may be unable to pump gas, they require electric too.....
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Dottie wrote:

Just as a rule of thumb I use 100 W equals 1 Amp for 120 Volt items. Everybody will jump up and say that is wrong because it is. The current for 100 W is actually less than 1 A. But if you use 1A per 100 W it gives you a safety factor to help keep from overloading the generator.
Bill
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Dottie wrote:

Generators are rated in watts not amps. If you need to know the ampere draw of the appliance you can come fairly close by dividing the wattage by the voltage of the appliance. A one hundred watt incandescent light bulb uses 100/120 or 0.833 amps. Six such bulbs use five amperes. ...
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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