generator question

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No, it's not. It's an oil-fired *boiler*. You do not have a furnace.
Like I said... the distinction is important whenever you're calling for service (or posting repair questions on Usenet). Boilers and their associated equipment are very different from, and more complicated than, furnaces. The world is full of (apparently) competent furnace techs who don't know their arses from their elbows when it comes to boilers. And if you need to call a local HVAC outfit for service on your system, you'd better tell them you have a boiler, so they send out a *boiler* tech.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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(Chris Lewis) wrote:

He doesn't *have* to use one of the 120V receptacles. It's perfectly possible, and safe, to derive a 120V circuit from the 120/240 receptacle, which is what he asked about, and what I told him how to do.

If he has hot water heat, he doesn't have a furnace blower. These dire predictions just aren't even remotely close to reality for a hot-water system.

Significant in comparison to their running current, yes. Significant in comparison to a 15A breaker, a circulator pump is not even close. Circulator pumps in residential hydronic systems use fractional-HP motors, typically 1/6 HP or less.

But he doesn't have a blower. He has a circulator. And it isn't going to draw anywhere near 10A running -- probably won't even get close to 10A on startup surge. My hydronic system is running *four* circulators, plus all the circulator switching controls, plus the boiler controls and ignition, plus the boiler fan-forced flue, all on a single 15A 120V circuit. We've been in this house eight years. Never tripped that breaker, not even when switching the system on for the first time each fall when the boiler and _all_four_ circulators kick on _simultaneously_.
This just isn't an issue with residential hot water systems.

No, it won't. He's perfectly fine.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Should be possible. If you're good with wiring, that is.
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Christopher A. Young;
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"miker" <mike snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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Yes this can be done I've done it with the exception of the 100 ft extension cord in my case it was only 10 ft long.
By using a 12 gauge extension cord the extra length should not be a problem.
In my case I measured the current consumption of the furnace(sorry boiler) It was never more then 5 amps. Orginally the boiler was hardwired to a switch box with simple toggle light switch used to shut off the boiler.
I removed the power feed from this switch box and used it to feed a 15 Amp outlet in seperate box right beside the switch box. I then feed the switch box from a short 12 gauge power cord that plugs into the new outlet.
When the power goes out I can unplug the furnace plug it into an extension cord running to my 800 Watt generator (120V outlet). Like you said not elegant but it almost meets code and works well. I've run the test run my furnace/boiler without any problems.
If your not comfortable in doing any of this it would be get help, but I suspect an electricain would not be able or willing to do this type of installation, like I said it doesn't quite meet code.
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wrote:

Sounds like a good approach; one I've considered doing myself. Very similar to one we used to use in a manufactoring plant to power the overhead lights in the switch gear rooms during plant-wide power shutdowns for electrical maintenance.
So, what's the code problem??
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wrote:

I thought the NEC says you can't have permanently installed eqpt, like a furnace, powered off of a cord that plugs into an outlet?
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Take apart the connecton box, un wirenut the wires from the furnace. Cut a lenth of electrical plug and cord off a junk appliance. Wirenut the cord to the furnace wires. Plug short cord into extension cord. Plug extension into generator.
When power comes back, wirenut the power and furnace wires, and set the cords aside for use next time.
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Christopher A. Young;
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