Generator power cord


I have a generator with 240 vac, 15 amp, output. Because I hate to spend money, I'm piecing together a cable from yardsale junk. Unfortunately, I got the wrong plug, so I'm shopping for the right one at a retail price. The manual specifies type L14-30p for the male end of the power cable. I bought one for $32, but I returned it because it was not suitable for outdoor use; there was no rubber gasket to keep the rain out.
Amazon.com has a Reliance L14-30P for $18, but I can't tell if it is suitable for outdoor use. Does anyone know if this plug is rainproof? (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Is there a better version at a reasonable price?
------------------------------------- Retired tech.\\//.
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Smartass wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Dunno. But consider this: Does the 240v outlet on the generator have some sort of cap or lid or plug to protect it from the rain if it's not in use?
No? Why is that?
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Smartass had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Re-Generator-power-cord-408164-.htm :
HeyBub wrote:

No; because there's no voltage there when it's not in use. It has a switch to select 120 or 240.
------------------------------------- Retired tech.\\//.
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Smartass wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)

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Smartass had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Re-Generator-power-cord-408166-.htm :
Van Chocstraw wrote:

I have considered that. I've also considered non-hardening caulk to fill the back of the plug. But, since I need to buy a plug, anyway, I'd like to know if it is weatherproof before I shuck out the money. ------------------------------------- Retired tech.\\//.
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Smartass wrote:

Why do you care whether it's weatherproof?
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On Nov 23, 3:54pm, anniemalover_at_hotmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (Smartass) wrote:

Run a gen in the rain!
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On Nov 23, 4:54�pm, anniemalover_at_hotmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (Smartass) wrote:

I don't know what your idea of "outdoor use" is. Most campgrounds have 50amp plugs to plug in a Camper. They are not what I call water tight, but I assume they are for outdoor use. They are the typical outlet inside a metal box. I am sure water could drip/drain onto them.
I think you may have difficulty finding one that is water tight, but making one for outdoor use should be no problem.
What is your worry?
Hank
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Smartass had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Re-Generator-power-cord-408253-.htm :
Hustlin' Hank wrote:

Camping isn't the only use for a generator. Anyway, I wouldn't be using a generator at a campsite that provides A/C power; the neighbors might not appreciate the noise. Perhaps you've never parked your RV at a primitive site; A/C power might be 50 miles away. Anyhow, I'm using my generator to power my home during power outages, which are quite common, here. Two years ago, the power was off for a week at one time.
By outdoor use, I mean that I am not using the generator to fill my house with carbon monoxide and noise. I park the generator as far away as possible and run a power cord to the house. Outages tend to occur during the rainy season, and I don't have a shed to cover the generator. I am thinking about building a small shed; maybe I can get a used doghouse from a yardsale next summer.
Some locking 240 vac plugs are designed to stay dry inside their housing even if you blast them with a hose. The one I returned to the store was designed to fill up with water in a drizzle. ------------------------------------- Retired tech.\\//.
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Smartass wrote:

While a shed would be a nice touch when adding gas and such, don't strain on it. Emergency generators are DESIGNED to work in inclement weather (rain, wind, dust storms, etc.).
As for plugs being designed to stay dry, here's a hint: IT DOESN'T MATTER IF THEY GET WET. Unless, maybe, they're submerged. Pure water is an insulator and rain water is as close to distilled as you can get without paying for it.
Sure, rain water with dissolved minerals IS a conductor, but there won't be any of that on a generator or its attendant plugs.
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In theory, you are correct. However, when I was knee high to a grasshopper, I touched a broken Christmas tree light socket on an outdoor tree in the rain and got a pretty good jolt. I don't think I made direct contact with the wire, so I'm still pretty cautious about that sort of thing.
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That's what I was trying to say when I pointed out that campground hook-ups aren't waterproof. I guess he didnt' "get it".
Hank
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