Generator on kerosene

Page 3 of 3  
More inserted.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In 1971 - don't ask me why - I was young and "green." I was a science teacher that wanted to show off my knowledge I guess. I bought a new Chevy Vega - and had a propane tank put in the trunk and a carb fitted that would work with propane. I was so proud that I had a car that could "run inside" with little pollution. Clean burning propane would allow the engine to run forever without needing new plugs or tuneups. In those days when cars started up - especially in winter - they idled terribly until they were warm but propane startups were really smooth. I would be helping the energy crisis - I told my students. What I did not tell them was - what a problem it was finding places to fill up. Also - that you got less miles per gallon on propane than gasoline. After a year or so - the whole idea wore thin (I got married) - I put the old carb back on and ran it on gasoline. In 1973 - Winnebago made the Brave motor home with a dual fuel option - gasoline and propane. Just the other day I was in the junk yard - buying a replacement engine for a friend's car. The junk yard guy - took us out in the yard with a 20 pound propane tank and a battery. Whenever we wanted to start and engine - that was sitting for months - he would stick a propane tube in the carb - hook up the battery - and the engine would fire right up and run smoothly. Harry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Makes me wonder. My van is usually hard to start -- it behaves like it takes six or seven seconds to get the fuel from the gas tank to the fuel pump.
Wonder if I coudl rig somethign with a 16 ounce propane tank, regulator, and a hose to the air intake. Give it a shot of propane for starting.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Probably a lot safer and easier to install an electric fuel pump if not already so equipped but the propane should work if properly installed and used. Don Young

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some of this discussion has moved from talking about diesel fuel in generators and moved to diesel fuel in automobiles. I skimmed through my file of "car talk" columns from the newspaper and found a familiar column which I had read last year. I was surprised by the apparent severity of even small amount of diesel, such as 1 gallon in 20, in the fuel for modern gasoline engines. I found this same article on the Internet and I've copied it below, along with appropriate credit to the authors (who have written several good books).
I am curious how extension the recommended fix would be if this person had actually run the engine with the diesel-gasoline mixture. All his wife did was put the mixture into the fuel tank.
Gideon
http://www.cartalk.com/content/columns/Archive/2004/July/08.html
Tom & Ray Magliozzi (The "Car Talk" guys) July 2004 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - Dear Tom and Ray:
This evening, my overworked, overbooked, type-A wife accidentally put about 3.5 gallons of diesel into her nearly empty 1998 Honda Odyssey. Upon realizing her mistake, she filled up the rest of the 12-gallon tank with gasoline. At that point, she wisely decided to call me before trying to drive it. I told her to park it, and I immediately called two mechanics to get their advice. I first called the dealer, and he said not to drive the car and to have it towed in. He said he would have to drain the gas tank and steam-clean it to get the diesel out and then check to see how far into the system the diesel fuel might have gotten. If we were lucky, it wouldn't have gotten sucked into the fuel pump, the fuel line or the injectors. If we weren't lucky, the dealer sure would be!
Then I called my trusty curbside mechanic, who comes to the house with all his tools and equipment in his truck and always provides me with reliable repair service for about a quarter of what the dealer quotes. He said that we probably could drive it. It would smoke some while the diesel burned out, but he thought that it might be OK, except maybe we would have to replace the oxygen sensors.
I usually like to take the path of least resistance, but in this case I felt it would be better to be safe than sorry, and we had the car towed in for service. What should we do before driving it? Thank you, and don't fuel like my wife.
-- Neil
RAY: Well, I think the dealer gave you the correct advice, Neil. But you might not need to be quite as thorough as he's suggesting. And you certainly don't have to let him do the work, if you like your buddy, Crusty McToolbox, better.
TOM: It sounds like your wife never even ran the engine with the diesel fuel. So, we can say with confidence that none of it got into the fuel lines. All of it's still in the tank.
RAY: The tank needs to be removed and drained. You can probably skip the steam-cleaning phase, as I'm guessing that less than half a cup of diesel will remain on the fuel-tank walls.
TOM: After you reinstall the tank and refill it with gasoline, I'd have Crusty remove the fuel line where it joins the fuel rail, up in the engine compartment. Then you can cycle the fuel pump (without running the engine) and take a sample of the fuel in a glass bottle. Let it settle out and see if it looks clean. Do this several times, or until you get good, clean-looking gasoline. Then hook everything back up and drive it.
RAY: The fuel injectors shouldn't be bothered, even if there is still a tiny amount of diluted diesel fuel in the tank -- it'll just burn right up in the cylinders without any problem. Crusty is right, though, that if you ran a quantity of diesel through the engine, you'd be putting the oxygen sensors at real risk. And they're not cheap to replace.
TOM: But I don't think the diluted remnants of half a cup of diesel fuel in 12 gallons of gasoline will do any harm. Of course, if we're wrong and your fuel system is ruined, let us know, so we can warn the next poor schlub who does this. Good luck, Neil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmm. That gets me thinking. I wonder if kerosene would do damage to a modern vehicle? I'm thinking like the times when the power is out, and I've got some kero around the house. But the truck is low on gas. Pour some kero into the truck.... or not?
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin,
The article I posted was a year old and was discussing a 1998 Honda Odyssey. I'd consider that to be a modern car - It's newer than 3 of my four vehicles. :)
Based upon that article which I posted, I'd avoid fuel oil in any gasoline engine.
Gideon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree, 1998 I consider to be modern.
OK, sounds like a good idea to avoid diesel in modern gasoline vehciles. too much electronic stuff, oxygen sensors, and so on.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.