Generator - magnetics loss?

Hi,
It's never happened to me and I've never seen it discussed, but every generator manual I've seen has instructions on what to do if the magnets in it beome weak or reversed. Grab a lantern battery, back charge it, turn it on and go sort of things.
I hope Ive made it understandable to know what I mean.
1. What causes the loss of magnetic field? 2. Is there a preventive method to avoid it? 3. Is there a sort of "in between" state where the mags are just weakened? What do you do then? 4. When you exercise a generator periodically, should you load BOTH poles or is one at a time OK to do? Should you use a light, moderate or heavy load?
Why am I asking? I haven't gotten the transfer switch installed yet. Probably won't until this fall. Money issues. It's a 5,000 Watt Koleman unit wiht a 10 HP B&S motor, interestingly enough, Industrial grade, not residential. It's kept us from freezing twice so far - THIS year that switch goes in!
Thanks for any knowledge that might be here
Pop
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1.Loosing the field exciter is rare in my experience. They break If you bought a Coleman it would be easier to get a spare set of parts for your genset. I used to work on them. Not an commercial unit by any means.
2. With the Coleman none that I am aware of
3. Not to my knowledge,
4. Exercise is sort of a personal thing. I have seen gensets exercised weekly and fail when they were needed. I have seen exercising monthly and work fine. As to the load I would use at least 80% of the rated output for 15 minutes, do not forget the cool down time. What does Coleman recommend?
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manual says nothing about what sort of load is best or anything else. I do allow for cool down etc, but the manual doesn't even mention it. It's pretty minimal for actual information, actually. The run time's really only necessary to keep the battery up and the fuel lines open and clean, I think. But I've always wondered how much load should be used. Nowadays I just toss a 1500 watt electric heater on it for 5 minutes or so.
I've found that about two weeks is a good cycle as long as the battery's in good shape and the garage doesn't get too cold. I keep it indoors and roll it out by the grounding rod when it's actually put into use, which fortunately isn't too often. It was a real Godsend, and only three months old, when the "Ice Storm of '98" hit us here in the northeast. That's also where I learned how to use clip leads & to unfasten the gas line so I could get gas out my car's tank; for four of those days no one was allowed on the roads except emergency vehicles. Wouldn't have done any good to go out anyway; none of the gas stations had generators either so they couldn't pump the gas they had! The national guard brought in hundreds of generators for the farmers in the area. Now I lay-in a safely stored supply of 30 gallons of gas now each year, soon's they switch to the "winter" gas. Haven't needed it all yet, but I don't intend to be using my car to pump gas again! I couldn't believe there was no way to get a siphon hose into the tank!!
Thanks for the memories,
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suggest you use Stabil in your spare gas.
Mark
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That's not a bad idea. I haven't had a problem yet, but those can be famous last words. The gas does get used, in rotation, but some of it stores for up to about 5 months or more. It gets used for the snowblower of course, plus keeping the generator full, and as soon as the weather warms we start using it in lawn tractors, etc., until it's gone. I've got about 11 gallons left right now so it's been there quite awhile. Natch, I use a filter-funnel when I fill equipment too; it's interesting the stuff you get in even brand new cans.
Thanks
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Pop wrote:

my gas or in my tools (over the winter), the tool will not start or is very hard starting. After giving up Stabil for good years ago, my tool always start easily.
Of course, your results my vary .... just my experience (perceived or otherwise).
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That can happen if you add too much. Also, if you ran the engine as you should, there is a store of Stabil in the bowl that has to be thinned out before the engine runs well so a couple extra seconds of start time is normal as is a littel smoke when it first starts.
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On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 09:47:14 -0400, in alt.home.repair RE: Re:

I've use Stabilt treated gasoline that has been stored in a sealed drum for 2 years. Never had a problem with it.
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