Generator Inlet

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On Dec 10, 1:29�pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I was thinking female inlet on my first response. But after a little (very little) research I found out that I was wrong.
As it stands now I am so confused I can't tell the difference between a male inlet or a female outlet. By the way, what does sex have to do with it?
Hank <~~~~all mail :-)
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In a generator inlet the only thing that can energize those exposed male pins is the generator that will be connected to them. The inlet is connected to one leg of the supply side of a switching arrangement that can either be connected to the generator inlet or to the utility power source but never both. The common connection of the switching arrangement is connected only to the loads that the generator will supply. Nothing on the load side of the switching arrangement is capable of producing power. -- Tom Horne
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The generac transfer kit I got was a complete kit with exterior box, sockets and cables, my exterior socket is male and the box can lock so nobody can get shocked if my panel malfunctions, your cable from the gen is now not standard purchase, female- male plug but male - male and is more dangerous, you must now make a gen cable. Have him change it. Look online for photos of transfer panels and exterior boxes it should be visable what kind of socket they show, a male. Try Generac, Honda and other sites. On another issue test the gen with a volt meter 60hz is 3600rpm is 120v. You should start unloaded a bit higher at 124v maybe 61hz and not drop to low testing full load, electric resistance heaters are good for a test. Everything has a V and HZ safe operating range, to low or to high and you might have repair bills soon. An electrician friend bought a new cheap unit, didnt check V, 20 minutes later his new TV smoked, it was putting out about 150v he said. Base motor rpm can be set, go for 122-24 v without load , then load it up and monitor it. A Kill a watt is good for HZ, your panel does have of course 2 watt meters so you can run it safely. Test it all first with electric heaters to rated load.
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wrote:

The generac transfer kit I got was a complete kit with exterior box, sockets and cables, my exterior socket is male and the box can lock so nobody can get shocked if my panel malfunctions, your cable from the gen is now not standard purchase, female- male plug but male - male and is more dangerous, you must now make a gen cable. Have him change it. Look online for photos of transfer panels and exterior boxes it should be visable what kind of socket they show, a male. Try Generac, Honda and other sites. On another issue test the gen with a volt meter 60hz is 3600rpm is 120v. You should start unloaded a bit higher at 124v maybe 61hz and not drop to low testing full load, electric resistance heaters are good for a test. Everything has a V and HZ safe operating range, to low or to high and you might have repair bills soon. An electrician friend bought a new cheap unit, didnt check V, 20 minutes later his new TV smoked, it was putting out about 150v he said. Base motor rpm can be set, go for 122-24 v without load , then load it up and monitor it. A Kill a watt is good for HZ, your panel does have of course 2 watt meters so you can run it safely. Test it all first with electric heaters to rated load.
Yes...I have the same set up in my house. I have a male inlet for plugging into the house. A lot of posters think that the male prongs sticking out are hot when the house is in normal operation. This is not the case as it comes with an emergency power transfer switch. It is has NO electricity to the male plug until it is plugged into the generator. It's like saying don't touch the ends of your male toaster plug in LOL... Jim
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Ok, after lots and lots of replies, I had the electrician out today (for another reason) and asked about the female inlet he installed. He agreed that male would be better, but that's what they (who ever they are) provided. I told the electrician that I was going to remove the female connector and add 3 wires going to a plug that would fit the genset. He said, "that's what I'd do!" When not in use, the cord easily folds up inside the inlet box, now that the female connector and its plate is gone. The cover still closes nicely keeping the cord and plug dry.
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Art,
Email me directly at : morriswelding at sasktel dot net and I'll send you digital photos of what I have installed by an electricial contractor...it work great ! so far (knock on wood) I haven't actually needed it, but have done a number of trial power outages to make sure everything works as designed... regards... Jim
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