Generator backup for house

I have a 220 volt panel that feeds my kitchen and family room. It has NO 220 volt appliances, heaters, ac, etc connected to it, only 110 volt units.
I have an RV with a 110 volt 4000 watt 30 amp output.
I have a disconnect switch to isolate this panel from the power company and from the rest of the house.
Is there a way to power up the panel with 110 volts from the RV generator to run the 110 volt appliances and lights which all together draw less than the 30 amp 110 volt rating?
thanks in advance for educating me,
John
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Did you figure surge load for motors as part of your run rating , you need to, it is from 2.5 - possibly 9 times run and the only way to know is testing everything with an amp meter, or your mobil unit may not work or last long. A transfer panel is best.
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yes, I have the surge figured in. I have the disconnect/transfer panel. What I need to know is: As all the appliances are 110 volts, can I power up a 220 panel and wiring with the 110 only generator?
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In order to run the panel from the RV's 120V generator (presuming you're going to do this simply by attaching the generator's hot wire to _both_ legs of the panel), not only must there be NO 240V loads, there must be NO shared-neutral circuits - aka "multi-wire branch circuits".
As one example: split receptacles.
If they ever ran two circuits in a single cable, you have shared neutrals.
If there are shared neutrals, you can overload 'em without blowing a breaker.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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see: http://home.howstuffworks.com/emergency-power4.htm
you need a positive interlock system on the house installed by an electrician not just a disconnect.
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wrote:

Yes. While it would be best to run a separate emergency line to those few appliances you need to survive the ice storm, you can do it with little work or danger.
Shut off all you circuit breakers and tie in the 110 to the disconnect and then bring up the ones you want.
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